Biolife Plasma Services

  www.biolifeplasma.com
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Biolife Plasma Services Reviews

Updated Jul 24, 2014
Biolife Plasma Services – US – “Biolife Plasma Services”

All Employees Current Employees Only

2.9 51 reviews

Review Highlights

Pros
  • Benefits are good, advancement opportunities exist, and lots of interaction with people every day(in 5 reviews)

  • You get a lot of interaction with many people, and the pay is good when you are starting out of school(in 4 reviews)


Cons
  • Open some holidays and every Saturday making it difficult to have a good work/life balance(in 6 reviews)

  • if upper management doesn't like you they will jump at first chance to fire you rather than help you work thru issues(in 3 reviews)

51 Employee Reviews
Relevance Date Rating
in
    • Culture & Values
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Career Opportunities

    4 people found this helpful  

    Stable Employment, Good Starter Career - Lacks long-term opportunity, employee appreciation, stressful, high turnover.

    Anonymous Employee (Former Employee)

    ProsExcellent beneifts, excellent time-off, VERY stable employer, does not cut hours on employees, modern facilities, leadership tries to be friendly and accessible. Teamwork is big within most loacations. Good pay at starting level with no experience. On the job training. Helping people with your work. Clean place to work and nice lunchrooms. Has policies in place for staff, which are followed, so hard-working staff don't have to put up with slackers. Working with the donors is great and outgoing personalities would like this job. Get to see the same donors each week. There is room for growth within the center locations, but pay will likely top out at $15.00- $16.00/hr unless you become a manager or relocate far away. Leaders in the plasma-collection industry. Much more organized and far above the competitors, when it comes to donor customer service. Blows the competition out of the water. Granted, most locations do not have competition, but if they do, donors that leave for a while often come back to BioLife.

    ConsThis job is extremely stressful, and it goes unrecognized and is not fully acknowledged or rewarded/ compensated. Staff are asked to perform every task to the tee of SOPs, cGMP, FDA, etc., while also focusing on achieving all kinds of internal metric goals. Have to process very quickly, get accurate venipunctures, great customer service, remain professional, deal with CONSTANT changes in policy and guidance. Nobody can even keep track of all of the changes. The management teams try to keep up and connect with employees. They receive so much communication from corporate, and are SO micro-managed, that they don't even have time to work with the staff. It's not really the regulation that's hard to keep up with. Anyone can get used to that. It's totally ineffective decision-making and disorganization in the upper level of BioLife. All departments tend to work in a vacuumed silo, with their own separate agenda. And so they hand down most communication for their department as if every single thing is a crisis. You never know what's really important because everything comes off as important.
    Getting a reminder about filling out 2 blanks on a spreadsheet for somebody's project vs dealing with all of the current production, HR, facility maintenance, strategic planning, quality assurance, training, marketing, logistics, employee development, is ridiculous. It's simply ridiculous. But it happens all day.
    Most importantly, beyond the facility locations, MEANINGFUL feedback is never requested. Things are handed down from the top, and thinking or questioning, or pointing out issues or suggesting alternatives is highly discouraged. "Just get on board" That's the message. So, this company is not for the thinking person. They want to solve all of your problems for you, and constantly try to fix things that are not broken at your location, for the sake of "consistency." It doesn't matter how many people BioLife certifies as Lean Green Belts. That doesn't make a company innovative. It's a nice career development tool, but the green belts are not used in a meaningful way. Who isn't a Lean Green Belt in BioLife these days?
    If cost is important, then why send an employee to BioLife University for a four hour class, ($1500+) when they can learn the same thing at the location in real life? Why are there so many odd job titles being added to different departments, when there are only three people working in the health and safety department? Why order expensive printed marketing materials for the centers automatically, vs. letting them chose? Why keep the Supervised Playroom open when it makes no money for the company or is empty most of the time? Why spend so much money on stylish materials, too much space, and design features in new facilities? When an older facility cannot get any storage space added, or much-needed work and maintenance completed short of the threat of losing donations in that location? Why pay a staff of 14 to work until late evening during the holidays, when there are 4 donors scheduled to come in for the last 3 hours of the day? Why complete repairs with the most expensive company available vs the local guy who can do it for 3 times less? You get the picture. Money is allocated without the whole picture perspective. It's needed in many areas where it's unavailable and hard to obtain, but appears to be available only for certain departments.
    There is a real lack of empowerment. Managers are not actually able to influence budget, donor compensation fees, promotions in any way beyond "rearranging" the months when they happen. Experienced manager input seems to count for nothing.
    The turnover is stressful to the staff AND to the managers. There is virtually NO money budgeted for staff appreciation. That's too bad, because these staff members deserve so many rewards. They work the hardest of all. Some geographical locations (where there are qualified applicants and plentiful job opportunities) have up to 50% turnover in a year. That much training, hiring, learning, working short-staffed is stressful. We're talking about that much turnover where there are between 40-80 employees. Imagine starting 20-40 people per year. Entry level jobs take 6-8 weeks for new staff to feel kind of comfortable in their positions. They are often forced to be on their own much too soon because locations lose so many staff. They feel rushed, they make mistakes, and who can blame them? They can't get the 1 on 1 time that they need because centers are so busy training and hiring, checking boxes and micro-managing. This is a real concern that has been omnipresent, but upper leadership still tells center management teams to "be ready/ be staffed" for some donor fees coming in the next 2 months. It takes 3 weeks just to hire if a candidate is good. Then they need to be trained. It's simply impossible to feel successful or ever caught up.
    And operational decisions like expanding appointments or adding hours are not made in conjunction with the location's management team. The teams are simply told what is going to happen, and to make it happen as soon as possible. Nevermind the fact that it will cause a great hardship to comply. That feedback is not invited. You are not seen as a teamplayer if you try to make sense of anything. You are seen as being "negative."
    If you want to move up, you'll likely have to relocate. If you become a Manager Trainee, you'll have to travel all of the time. Trainees are mostly used as support personnel. Senior leadership is trying to fill positions in locations that haven't been built, so they are talking up supervisors without talking to their current managers- at the current locations- to see how it would impact that location to lose a large chunk of their talent. And, many times, this talk is misleading. the young supervisors think they have a good chance of becoming a manager at the new location. However, the regions where these new locations are opening usually have their candidates pre-selected before the location opens. You can apply, but it seems like a show for HR's sake. They usually know who they want from the start. This isn't fair, and it sets a bad example for future leaders.
    Politics are rampant. When long-term people don't talk on conference calls, that's a bad sign. That means they either aren't competent enough to think of good questions, they know their feedback will be taken personally or put down, or they've totally given up on bothering. The go-getters that are just beginning their career are the ones that try the hardest. In the future, they will eventually learn that this is pointless.
    As a man, even I have to say that there is a bias towards male leaders once you start looking at the manager level and above. And an unconsious bias against women in leadership. I've seen it firsthand. The company is made up of mostly female staff, however, at the level of manager and above, females are usually promoted to supporting roles, reporting to a male. Men are the majority of regional managers, and directors, and seem to be promoted over female candidates for manager positions. I was once asked by my own boss when "so-and-so" will be ready for a management position. So and so was a male. And, my boss did not make the same inquiry about the three females at So-and-so's same position level. Also, So-and-so was having performance issues, and was later termed for sexual harassment. I had never stated that So-and-so was promotable. It was just randomly brought up by my boss. Another boss was brand new. This boss stated to me, without even being on topic, that he "wants to promote" one of my male leadership team, after meeting with him for less than an hour. He never inquired about the female leader, who was performing at the exact same standards. I was once in the room when a Director said the words "I've worked with Type A women like you before" and went on to talk about his judgement of how she probably thinks. He didn't even know her. And he was also wrong.
     I left for all of these reasons. I probably stayed too long. I stayed for the staff members and fellow leaders that worked with me at that location. I was not fired, not on the verge of being fired, was well-liked, and still have many, many friends in the company. I value the connections that I made during my time. There are some great people all over the company, with excellent ideas and a lot of talent. There are a lot of very nice people and there are plenty of hardworking staff members making things happen at the lowest level of the locations every day. Those staff members make the biggest difference of all. Most staff and low-level leaders see these issues, too. However, most believe it's pointless to say anything, and perhaps they are correct?

    Advice to Senior ManagementI don't think that senior leadership will read this and take it seriously. They probably don't look at these reviews. If they did, they will just see this review and just say "Oh-well, it's just a disgruntled employee, and we've got them replaced anyway." That's too bad, because without looking at themselves honestly, they will continue to scratch their heads, and patch over the symptoms without treating the disease. Effective change must begin at the top.

    No, I would not recommend this company to a friend – I'm optimistic about the outlook for this company

    • Culture & Values
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
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    • Career Opportunities

     

    A decent company with challenges

    Plasma Center Technician (Current Employee) Broken Arrow, OK (US)

    ProsInteract with different people daily. Ability to cross-train into dfferent areas of the business. Most stress stems from having the donors watching you when things are busy. Great people at the facility. A thorough training program enables anyone to learn phlebotomy.

    ConsA fluid schedule that is always changing makes it hard to plan things outside of work. Expanding hours when the facility is not busy is a decision that is wrong. Work/Life balance is not even. The manager is two-faced and even bragged about calling in sick when he was hungover.

    Advice to Senior ManagementKeep a continuous flow of information about why things are happening such as expanding hours and the company split.

    Yes, I would recommend this company to a friend

    • Culture & Values
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Career Opportunities

     

    A great company to be a part of

    Senior Plasma Center Technician (Former Employee) Sheboygan, WI (US)

    ProsBenefits are good, advancement opportunities exist, and lots of interaction with people every day! This is a social workplace. Compensation is fair, annual raises are common. The location is Sheboygan is VERY well managed. The manager cares about individual employees and is a good advocate for them when dealing with the demands of higher management.

    ConsSchedule and hours vary even for full time employees, often micromanaged by supervisors, very goal driven company. At times, they struggle to find the proper balance between taking good care of employees vs. decisions that meet the company's goals. Specifically- the productivity metric goals require employee sacrifice that is unreasonable for some.

    Advice to Senior ManagementManagers, supervisors, etc: you guys make ALL the difference in a work environment like this. The small encouragements make a big difference. Talking to employees as people instead of a means to meeting a goal is important. It is always a plus when supervisors are willing to put on a lab coat and do even the lowest tasks at times so that employees feel like they're on the same team as their management.

    Yes, I would recommend this company to a friend – I'm optimistic about the outlook for this company

  1. We want your feedback – Are these company reviews helpful to you?  Yes | No
    • Culture & Values
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Career Opportunities

     

    Hard work, but very rewarding career

    Anonymous Employee (Current Employee)

    ProsGreat pay for those that have a high school diploma as their highest level of academic achievement. The benefits are amazing including health, dental, vision, 401K, and tuition reimbursement. It is rewarding to know that the work you put in everyday is bettering patients lives and even saving them in some cases. Great opportunity for advancement if you are willing to put in the work to get there. Great atmosphere with fun people.

    ConsUndesirable hours that mean starting very early in the morning or working late into the evening. Open some holidays and every Saturday making it difficult to have a good work/life balance. Operational policies and hours are changed frequently to meet the demand for the product. The company has to be very demanding so they are able to meet their goals as patients lives depend on it. You really have to embrace the goals and become part of the team to adjust to the disadvantages.

    Advice to Senior ManagementKeep the triple bottom line in mind when strategizing to meet goals and forming policies. The business is important and the goals need to be met, but the employee's needs have to be taken into account in those decisions as well. The knowledge and experience each employee has cannot be replaced by hiring someone new.

    Yes, I would recommend this company to a friend

    • Culture & Values
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Career Opportunities

     

    Tolerable

    Medical Supervisor (Current Employee) Green Bay, WI (US)

    ProsGreat people, managment is a little young and inexperienced. Rapid advancement opportunity available to non nursing staff. Average pay and benefits.

    ConsNo opportunity to advance for nurses, the expectation is that you will cross train to fill lesser roles when you are not engaged in nursing activities. Work/life balance is approaching that of a hospital as the company continually expands hours to increase profitability. Wages stagnant with annual increases that barely match inflation.

    Advice to Senior ManagementAdd at least one nurse to the management/decision making team. I don't like the fact that a group of 25 y/o's with no medical expertise or experience is determing how I should best do my job.

    No, I would not recommend this company to a friend – I'm not optimistic about the outlook for this company

    • Culture & Values
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Career Opportunities

     

    Enjoyable, educational, and a bit of a struggle.

    Senior Plasma Center Technician (Former Employee) Harrisonburg, VA (US)

    ProsDecent pay for not having any phlebotomy experience. The training wasn't too bad either, could be sped up a little more.
    Very nice vacation time.
    Good hours during the day.

    ConsThe management seem to have a hard time listening to their employees that have suggestions. A little too much drama leaking into working causing a dysfunctional team.

    Advice to Senior ManagementListen every now and then and you might have things running smoother.

    Yes, I would recommend this company to a friend

    • Culture & Values
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Career Opportunities

     

    Great

    Senior Plasma Center Technician (Former Employee) Boise, ID (US)

    ProsEnvironment is awesome, and people are really nice.

    ConsThey expect their employees to stay late day after day, witch can be nice sometimes but when their are kids involved staying hours after your shift is expected to be over is uncalled for. They have favorite employees also, and most of them slack, while the hard working employees get no recognition.

    Advice to Senior ManagementDon't get rid of the good employees, watch the Masters!

    No, I would not recommend this company to a friend

    1 person found this helpful  

    Horrible

    Anonymous Employee (Former Employee)

    ProsOnly that the pay was competitive

    ConsManagement was harassing and hostile. They made unsafe decisions in the name of productivity putting donors and employees at risk.

    Advice to Senior ManagementTake complaints serious and don't falsify documentation.

    • Culture & Values
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Career Opportunities

     

    Dedication and Hard work do not pay off here.

    Anonymous Employee (Current Employee) Green Bay, WI (US)

    ProsThe benefits the company offers are excellent. Health insurance benefits are better than most work places, they also offer 401k, life insurance, spouse and dependent life insurance and they cover domestic partner's and their children. They offer great discounts with various different companies and services. There is a decent amount of PTO available.

    ConsPoor compensation, almost non existent annual pay increases, shady dishonest management, broken promises. There is a lack of communication between the abundance of management and the employees. Schedules are extremely inconsistent. It is hard to get any type of work/life balance. Management does not care about employees as individuals.

    Advice to Senior ManagementUpper management seems to be blind about what is really happening in the various centers. If they want to reduce the employee turn over rate they should hire more experienced center managers who start treating their employees like they are valued.

    No, I would not recommend this company to a friend – I'm not optimistic about the outlook for this company

    • Culture & Values
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Career Opportunities

     

    Not bad for temporary, but this job can be spiritually exhausting

    Anonymous Employee (Current Employee)

    ProsYou get a lot of interaction with many people, and the pay is good when you are starting out of school. Far more money than your average LPN LVN position here.

    ConsThe business expects more from their employees than can be expected. This causes a lot of employees to be dissatisfied, but the pay is good enough that some push it out. They don't require certifications for any of their phlebotomists, so many don't have the ability to sustain their lifestyles outside of this company, causing begrudging job lock.

    Advice to Senior ManagementWhile it is important to grow your business, do not treat your employees as interchangable cogs, with no value. Also, realize that a overwhelming majority of the people that donate plasma are going to come, regardless of your hours. So scheduling employees until late at night is not conducive to either business or morale.

    No, I would not recommend this company to a friend

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