Blue Cross (MI)
3.1 of 5 104 reviews
www.bcbsm.com Detroit, MI 5000+ Employees

Blue Cross (MI) Reviews

Updated Apr 16, 2014
All Employees Current Employees Only

3.1 104 reviews

                             

77% Approve of the CEO

Blue Cross (MI) President and CEO Daniel J. Loepp

Daniel J. Loepp

(62 ratings)

64% of employees recommend this company to a friend
104 Employee Reviews
Relevance Date Rating
in

Review Highlights

Pros:
  • "Large company with great benefits and salaries"
    in 13 reviews
  • "Competitive pay, good benefits after being hired in as a full time employee"
    in 8 reviews
Cons:
  • "Upper management gives the impression they are too good for lower level employees"
    in 4 reviews
  • "Very top heavy, manager and above are out for themselves and do not acknowledge or promote when appropriate"
    in 4 reviews
  • Show more review highlights

Reviews

1 person found this helpful  

Worst company to work for.

Audit (Current Employee)
Detroit, MI (US)

I have been working at Blue Cross (MI) full-time for more than 8 years

ProsThere are no pros for this company.

ConsBlack women are worth 3 points, white women are worth 2 points, white men are worth 1 point and black men are worth 0 points in the eyes of management.

The older white men do most all of the work. Then they toss an inexperienced black woman or a white woman on top to take all of the credit. Black men have no value.

Advice to Senior ManagementJust keep collecting those paychecks from the people of the state of Michigan.

No, I would not recommend this company to a friend

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1 person found this helpful  

Leadership needs improvement

Anonymous Employee (Current Employee)
Detroit, MI (US)

I have been working at Blue Cross (MI) full-time for more than 10 years

ProsGood salary and benefits. Co-workers are helpful and want to do a good job. I've worked there 15 years and my teammates will go above and beyond to meet deadlines and do a good job. That includes no lunches, working in the evenings and on weekends.

ConsWorkers are rarely given a voice at the table. In the last three years, my leader's mantra has been "Get is done on time and fix it later" - so inferior programs and products are going out the door. When a worker speaks up and tries to provide a good outcome they are threatened with their jobs or re-assigned to projects. Their IT team is not good (not helpful, can't handle the complexity and load required, etc.) and should be vended out to improve quality.

Also, the commute/parking is horrible. It would be nice to work from home more, or have the option of working in a non-Detroit location. Every morning when I get into the elevators everyone is dour and upset about their ride into the city and/or the long walk from the parking lots (at the Ren Cen); it's a bad way to start the day.

Advice to Senior ManagementListen to your people. When your focus is on your next promotion instead of producing good work that will help your customers the whole company suffers.

Yes, I would recommend this company to a friend

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Beware of the culture

Individual Contributor (Current Employee)
Detroit, MI (US)

I have been working at Blue Cross (MI) full-time for more than 5 years

ProsBenefits (medical, dental, vision, and so on) as well as a percentage towards a pension. Some departments give the ability to work at home. To escape the culture; this might be your only solace.

Cons[The following is what I've observed and overheard. The entire company does not fit the description, but this seems to be the overall reputation - but it's a silo(ed) environment so take of it what you may]

Overall culture is very sporatic - no consistency. (1) Though tools are in place to assess the skills one brings to a position or a possible position, they're not being utilized. I've seen (and experienced) people being hired for their skill set, but eventually losing their skills because they're being underutilized. If you want to grow and you have limited skills; this may be the company for you. If you want to grow and you brought a variety of skills that were needed to the company (or department); beware. You risk in them gaining from your skills and experience, but will not investing in you.

(2) Nepotism is blatant. You have those that have the degrees and the skills along with those who networked via a family member with no skills, experience, and possibly no degree. Personally, nothing is wrong with that...as long as it's not being claimed that everyone is being held to the same standard when it's obvious that it's not being done. For example, there could be an available analyst position. There can be a person that has been with the company, with a degree/skills/experience and another person without these things. The one without will be hired and trained and the one that wanted an opportunity and has proven his or her worth may not even get an interview. Know that just because a job is posted, it doesn't mean that it hasn't already been allocated. So when you apply, and it's just not making sense that you're not getting an interview, and you've taken the initiative to contact HR and they don't respond to an email or voice mail - it might not be you. They might not be that into you (and can't explain it - therefore they avoid you) or it's allocated for someone else (inside or outside the company).

(3) Therefore, I understand why tuition reimbursement isn't being utilized as much as they expect for a lot of people don't see the point of getting their degree anymore. There are those with degrees that can't get past customer service, specialist, administrative assistant, or technician roles. I've watched some of these people be a great asset, but depending on their manager, they're not seen past their title although they're doing the work of an analyst, senior analyst, health care analyst, manager...you name it. It's obvious that some are being taken advantage. Some managers and leaders...when they know you can do it, they will use you and keep you in the position for as long as they can; paying you less than you're worth.

(4) Some managers or departments do not seem to invest in professional development as well. They do not invest in their people by doing cross-functional training, allowing them to go to conferences or are not supportive by investing in their teams joining professional organizations. Do not come expecting that. Some managers and leaders don't even bother asking anymore. It used to be a part of the performance review. Not any longer. Know that you must invest in yourself, but because it's in such a bubble, the "best practices" that you learn, might not be accepted.

(5) Also, beware for you may be in a role for a long time. Some jobs do not have career paths although it seems they should. If you try to go to a different department, it seems difficult for talent management and leaders to assess skills to determine if someone is even appropriate for an interview if it doesn't fit a position's title. The risk is that you might be stuck in a department with seemingly no way out. Some talent managers will look at your resume to discuss your gaps in skills and ways to improve and some will avoid you (or avoid doing it) like the plague.

(6) Also, do not assume that because someone is your manager, that they know what you do or can explain what you do. It can be scary because this person can't truly fight for you (some can pretend because of their personality, but it only takes one person to see through the facade). Because of the many re-orgs (when they move people around and place them under different people), some don't know and don't want to know what you do unless they're suddenly questioned by their leadership. Then they will scramble and ask for "crip notes" of what you do everyday. Again...scary. Do not assume that those that are managers know how to be managers. Most managers are also project managers, but they don't know what this role involves. Therefore, they agree to something when it's not appropriate (being a "yes" man or woman). Some will even attempt to throw something together or have someone they trust to handle it, fall flat, deny or blame, fight to regain their reputation as a result; resulting in the entire team looking bad. So do not assume that managers are leaders. They are two different things. Also, know that you might experience leaders that only show up when there is an attempt to make a major change and then they disappear or stand back to determine if it's a success or not. If you have that type of leader; you risk not having work-life balance as well as no success from your commitment to what you thought were your leader's goals.

(7) Sometimes there is no vision. If you're task-oriented. This will work for you, but we've all seen what happens to companies with no clear vision and we all (should) know the risk if your particular job does not add value (in how it's defined by the company - remember when the government shut down? - read up what's considered value add versus non-essential).

(8) Also, know that your manager or team leader might not be for you. Some are "faking it until they make it - or understand it" and though you have the experience and degree - they will make you think you're crazy at times instead of simply seeing you as an asset on their team. These are people that are controlling. There can also be hidden agendas that you are just not going to understand if you're a person that thinks that you're part of a team. Keep your mouth shut and watch closely. Trust no one.

(9) Just like in any other environment, some people are nice and some are not. Some are professional and some are not. Some will place you in a box. For example, some feel that you have to pay your "having to be here for a certain amount of years" dues or "not being old enough" dues or even "you're not what I expected" dues. This comes out when there is an announcement that someone doesn't agree with. For example, the person was only with the company 2 years and now he's a manager or why did she get that manager position (they're looking at her age and ethnicity rather than her degrees and skills). Yes, it still happens. I've only observed and "heard" about it from other employees, not managers or leaders, but these are the people's opinions that I'm privy to. Keep quiet. Be careful who you tell details of your life. They can come across as very sweet, but they're not. They'll place sarcasm to your accomplishments such as "why are you getting your doctorate; give it to him to do since he's getting his doctorate." Now, these are individuals that are usually in the good graces of a manager and feel "comfortable" in saying these things. Either people are lying or it occurs...you pick what you believe. I just suggest being careful in what you share (but sometimes being quiet is frowned upon because you're not sharing your personal life). I used to believe that affirmative action was no longer necessary - not anymore and remember this company is majority women. It is a good old girl and boys club. Again, it's silo(ed) so this is what is seen or heard about in one division.

(10) People have been with the company for many years and when you notice that one director is against another or one manager is against another, watch yourself. You don't know who has worked with who in the past and making any comments can come back to bite you. People (usually managers and some aspiring to become managers) will play both sides (even against their own director). If you're into politics, you can probably maneuver this culture, but if you're not and just want to get some "good" benefits (although there are no medical benefits provided for retirement if you started after January 1, 2007) - beware.

The company is so big, so there has to be good going on somewhere. I believe that there are areas that people are happy to go to work everyday, people genuinely care about each other's interests, people are truly a team. There has to be...

Advice to Senior ManagementManagers and up usually do not care about the minutiae, but I will advise this. If you are a director and above and what was stated is truly a surprise to you and you want to change it, when you have those "surveys" (which are normally good) - follow through. Stop wasting your money and others' time just because it is "this year's goal" when you truly don't want to fix what most see as problems. Know that if you only have one person in your "ear" (i.e. you're only talking to your "right-hand" or your direct reports), you may not know A LOT. These same people will only tell you something in a way that keeps them out of "harms" way. Directors and up, people hide things from you all the time! Why might you ask? Because their controlling ways caused a failure in some way and deep down, they feel that their job may be at risk because of things they ignored, didn't prioritize, or are against (but will not tell you that). Find a way to know what's going on within your area (if you don't have time to speak to the underlings, you sign off on their performance reviews - at least read the summaries!).

No, I would not recommend this company to a friend

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Best job I've ever had

Communications Intern (Current Employee)
Detroit, MI (US)

I have been working at Blue Cross (MI) as an intern for less than a year

ProsFun projects that actually mattered to the department. Work was published and impacted business decisions. Came out with an awesome portfolio. Great team, great leaders. Fun office culture. Well paid.

ConsHonestly don't have any. It's a great internship program that I'd highly recommend to students.

Advice to Senior ManagementThank you - keep up the good work.

Yes, I would recommend this company to a friend – I'm optimistic about the outlook for this company

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Great exposure to corporate culture.

Anonymous Employee (Former Employee)
Detroit, MI (US)

I worked at Blue Cross (MI) as an intern for less than a year

ProsInternship program is well structured. I had great exposure to the industry and built a strong network to help further my career.

ConsNot much opportunity for entry level positions.

Advice to Senior ManagementContinue to focus on developing your internship program.

Yes, I would recommend this company to a friend

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BCBSM has a very political and unpredictable culture

Senior Auditor (Former Employee)
Detroit, MI (US)

I worked at Blue Cross (MI) full-time for more than 10 years

ProsVery good health benefits, free parking, not prone to boom & bust cycles, close to expressway location, tight building security

ConsLeaders are nervous and clueless. They constantly hire contractors to tell them what they should do. When things go wrong, they find underling scapegoats and frame them. If you are minding your business and not kissing up the ladder, no matter how well you do the job, your job is at risk.

No, I would not recommend this company to a friend

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1 person found this helpful  

Disturbingly Incompetent

Application Development Intern (Former Employee)
Detroit, MI (US)

I worked at Blue Cross (MI) as an intern for more than a year

ProsFlex-time, a few good people, the high-rise vantage point

ConsThis is one of the most dysfunctional organizations I've ever encountered. Its dismal claim metrics consistently place it in the 20th percentile of all plans in the Blue Cross Blue Shield network, and the reason for its horrible performance is reflected in the general incompetency of its employees. Leadership is absolutely clueless -- a great contingency of managers have zero training in project management and do not understand the principles of successful team building. The employees under them are hardly any better; if you are even modestly intelligent, your days will be filled with hand-holding and nurturing of the dumb and slow. If you are in fact good at what you do, expect to be a constant anchor for the flailing and drowning (buoy them long enough, and watch the bad swimmers get seamlessly promoted for their good golf swing and/or ability to spread gossip). Also, the entire employee base is sickly-looking and overweight -- departments are constantly engaged in weight-watcher small-talk and unofficial weight-loss tournaments. This company is very disturbing.

Advice to Senior ManagementIf this was a public company, you all would have been fired a long time ago.

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Great Company, a little to LEAN

Manager (Current Employee)
Detroit, MI (US)

I have been working at Blue Cross (MI) full-time for more than 8 years

ProsCompany provides great opportunities to move within and learn different aspects of the business.

ConsLeadership advancement beyond manager level becomes political. Expectation is to do more with less.

Advice to Senior ManagementKnow the job your employees perform

Yes, I would recommend this company to a friend

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Nice working environment

IT Consultant (Current Employee)
Mumbai (India)

I have been working at Blue Cross (MI) full-time for less than a year

Prosmonthly bonus provide by company

ConsNo cons are there only strong points

Advice to Senior Managementmanagement is very good throughout

Yes, I would recommend this company to a friend – I'm optimistic about the outlook for this company

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Overall good steady reliable company to work for.

Senior Underwriter (Current Employee)
Southfield, MI (US)

I have been working at Blue Cross (MI) full-time for more than 3 years

ProsBenefits are really good, the company does encourage work/life balance. The company is very stable and less impacted by downturns in the economy.

ConsLeadership seems to be very slow at promoting the people that contributes the greatest value to the team. Promotions are very political.

Yes, I would recommend this company to a friend – I'm optimistic about the outlook for this company

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Glassdoor is your free inside look at Blue Cross (MI) reviews and ratings - including employee satisfaction and approval ratings for Blue Cross (MI) CEO Daniel J. Loepp. All 104 reviews are posted anonymously by Blue Cross (MI) employees.