Compare Nature Publishing Group vs PLOS BETA

See how working at Nature Publishing Group vs. PLOS compares on a variety of workplace factors. By comparing employers on employee ratings, salaries, reviews, pros/cons, job openings and more, you'll feel one step ahead of the rest. All salaries and reviews are posted by employees working at Nature Publishing Group vs. PLOS. Learn more about each company and apply to jobs near you.
Nature Publishing Group company icon

Nature Publishing Group

PLOS company icon

PLOS

Employee Ratings

  • Nature Publishing Group scored higher in 8 areas: Overall Rating, Career Opportunities, Compensation & Benefits, Work-life balance, Senior Management, Culture & Values, CEO Approval and % Recommend to a friend.
  • PLOS scored higher in 1 area: Positive Business Outlook.
Overall Rating
(full-time and part-time employees only)
Overall Rating
(full-time and part-time employees only)
3.2
(based on 78 reviews)
Nature Publishing Group employees rated their Overall Rating 0.5 higher than PLOS employees rated theirs.
Overall Rating
(full-time and part-time employees only)
2.7
(based on 78 reviews)
Career Opportunities
Career Opportunities
2.6
Career Opportunities
2.5
Compensation & Benefits
Compensation & Benefits
3.1
Compensation & Benefits
3.0
Work-life balance
Work-life balance
4.0
Nature Publishing Group employees rated their Work-life balance 0.3 higher than PLOS employees rated theirs.
Work-life balance
3.7
Senior Management
Senior Management
2.9
Nature Publishing Group employees rated their Senior Management 0.4 higher than PLOS employees rated theirs.
Senior Management
2.5
Culture & Values
Culture & Values
3.1
Nature Publishing Group employees rated their Culture & Values 0.3 higher than PLOS employees rated theirs.
Culture & Values
2.8
CEO Approval
CEO Approval
Nature Publishing Group Ceo Steven Inchcoombe
74%
74%Steven Inchcoombe
Nature Publishing Group employees rated their CEO Approval 12% higher than PLOS employees rated theirs.
CEO Approval
PLOS Ceo Alison Mudditt
62%
62%Alison Mudditt
% Recommend to a friend
% Recommend to a friend
59%
Nature Publishing Group employees rated their % Recommend to a friend 18% higher than PLOS employees rated theirs.
% Recommend to a friend
41%
Positive Business Outlook
Positive Business Outlook
27%
Positive Business Outlook
39%
PLOS employees rated their Positive Business Outlook 12% higher than Nature Publishing Group employees rated theirs.

Salaries

Nature Publishing Group has 15 more total submitted salaries than PLOS.
Salaries for similar jobs
Salaries for similar jobs
Associate Editor7 Salaries
£33,133/yr
Manuscript Assistant3 Salaries
£21,345/yr
Senior Sales Executive2 Salaries
£42,474/yr
Salaries for similar jobs
Associate Editor7 Salaries
£38,749/yr

What Employees Say

  • PLOS had 4 more reviews than Nature Publishing Group that mentioned "Work life balance" as a Pro.
  • "Low pay" was the most mentioned Con at Nature Publishing Group.
  • "High turnover" was the most mentioned Con at PLOS.
Pros
Pros
"Work life balance"(in 15 reviews)
"Nice people"(in 6 reviews)
Pros
"Work life balance"(in 19 reviews)
"Open access"(in 10 reviews)
Cons
Cons
"Low pay"(in 10 reviews)
"Upper management"(in 4 reviews)
Cons
"High turnover"(in 7 reviews)
"Good people"(in 5 reviews)
Featured Review

Former Employee - Sub Editor

I worked at Nature Publishing Group full-time for more than a year

Pros

in touch with some amazing research, professional working environment

Cons

work is tedious at times

Current Employee - Editor

I have been working at PLOS full-time

Pros

I have worked in editorial positions at several other science publishers and my experience with PLOS has been the best by far. What I really like about PLOS, and what I think sets it apart from other... publishers, is: - The mission. Colleagues and management genuinely care about open access and it just feels great to work for a company that cares about more than just turning a profit or delivering results to shareholders. - The office environment. Colleagues are friendly and supportive, and generous with their time and expertise. People seem to genuinely get along. PLOS also facilitates opportunities to meet with people outside of your immediate team through regular meetings and weekly social events, which helps foster collaboration and unity. - The editorial teams. PLOS is staffed by some of the smartest and hardest working people around. The workload can be intense – there is always more work than there are hours in the day, and the submissions never stop coming – but the goals are reasonable and the senior managers take steps to ensure that the workload is manageable for all editors. I’ve never before worked for a company that cares so much about employees’ work-life balance and where concerns about workload are openly discussed and acted upon. - The work. There’s a lot of it, but it’s varied and interesting. You’ll learn something new and different each day. - The management. The CEO has set a tone of openness and respect within the company. She gives updates at regular company-wide briefings but also holds open office hours to meet 1:1 with all interested employees. She has a very clear view of how she wants to see the company grow in the coming years, which she communicates regularly (and directly) to all staff members. These briefings really help reinforce how our work is contributing to success of the overall mission. Furthermore, the sense of openness and respect is readily apparent in other areas of the company – for example, human resources, who are just about the kindest and most considerate and helpful people on the planet (which has not been my experience at any other company!); and finance, who share regular updates on the company’s overall health and respond immediately to any questions regarding payroll or reimbursement. Employees are treated really well.

Cons

Science publishing in general is going through a massive upheaval, and it’s not at all clear what the landscape will look like in 5-10 years. I have a lot of confidence in our CEO and senior managers..., as they’ve already made some really hard choices to help PLOS weather the uncertainty that lies ahead. Unfortunately, those hard choices have led to problems with morale in some cases. This is now a known issue and is being openly discussed, though it’s tricky to solve. Overall, I feel like PLOS is firmly on the right track, though there have been and will continue to be some bumps and diversions along the way. Additionally, as PLOS is not a massive publisher, opportunities for career advancement are a little limited once you've been in a role for a couple of years. PLOS invests heavily in personal development, so you'll develop skills that will make you an attractive candidate for positions outside of PLOS, but it's a shame that there are not more career opportunities at higher levels within PLOS. I don't think anything can be done about it, it's just a facet of working for a smaller publisher, and there are many pros to outweigh this particular con.

Job Postings