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ALDI

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ALDI

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ALDI Work Life Balance FAQ

Read what ALDI employees think about work life balance at the company and make sure this fits your lifestyle. Employees have questions about everything from the work from home policy, overtime and flexibility.

ALDI has a work life balance rating of 2.7.

All answers shown come directly from ALDI Reviews and are not edited or altered.

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6 English questions out of 6

5 June 2021

What is working from home like at ALDI?

Pros

Benefits, Pay, Company culture and initiatives are moving in a very proactive direction, work from home opportunities

Cons

No cons that I can think of. If you work hard you will be rewarded well.

Benefits, Pay, Company culture and initiatives are moving in a very proactive direction, work from home opportunities

5 June 2021

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26 October 2020

How is the work/life balance at ALDI?

Pros

Gives you valuable experience. Only for the hard working.

Cons

Poor work life balance, poor management, brag about paying staff good amount even though other retailers pay better.

Advice to Management

Reduce the staff turnover rates

Poor work life balance, poor management, brag about paying staff good amount even though other retailers pay better.

26 October 2020

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13 August 2020

What is overtime like at ALDI?

Pros

The pay is good if you are working the overtime.

Cons

The first thing you will hear is that ALDI goes through a high amount of Manager Trainees . District Managers change and are directly hired with no experience.

The pay is good if you are working the overtime.

13 August 2020

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18 January 2022

Does ALDI reimburse for mileage?

Pros

To their credit, ALDI did have some really good benefits. Paid overtime, travel reimbursement for filling in at other stores (I was even put up in nice hotels when I traveled across the state), good co-workers, some limited opportunity for advancement, dedicated day off every week, holidays off, decent health insurance, some free food or discounted last day items (depending on your manager), free shirts and apparel, and you got really good exercise every day. They also gave excellent training for the job in their training center and you got decent hours- if you wanted a full 40 you got it every week. If you needed a day off and have a week with 32 hours- that was fine. There were a lot of things I got to do including opening a new ALDI location and meeting a lot of people by traveling to other stores to fill in. I do have to say thank you to ALDI for all the positive opportunities they gave me to grow as a person and professionally.

Cons

Alright now the bad stuff. As many positives as ALDI had, there were also a LOT of negatives. The job is a hard job compared to many other retail or grocery jobs today. If your stocking the expectation was that you put 2 pallets away every hour. You really need to move fast and think about where things go as you plan your route through the store with each pallet. Drops and spills kill your time also, so you really gotta be careful as well. After all the load gets put away your timed on register, they want you to be fast and efficient while still not totally destroying the groceries as they go in the cart. Finally you need to keep the store looking nice, clean and sanitize surfaces, help customers find items, clean up spills and cover your employees breaks. I was a shift manager so I didn't do as much register service but I did a lot of everything else. If you are looking for a clipboard manager job don't work at ALDI you will be doing everything even if you become a Store Manager. There is also ZERO way to become corporate from stores. If you ever want to not be putting away pallets don't make it a career job. They hire all the DM's right from college. Now all this takes a lot of training which they do provide, but even if you succeed and become a solid employee its a hard life. You get little cuts and scars, you need to lift properly or your back will hurt, and customer service is just a lot to put up with sometimes. All this would be fine- but one major thing changed in my time at ALDI. Was it worth it? At the start it was. I started making $13/hr as a stocker and $17/hr after I became a shift manager. That was in 2018 when most jobs paid like $8-10/hr. When I left ALDI in 2020 I was making the same amount, for the same high skill job- BUT wages went up by so much everywhere else, it wasn't worth it anymore. If Target, Chick-Fil-A, Kroger and Hobby Lobby are paying $15 starting for entry level, easy jobs; then ALDI should be paying $21-22 for stockers and $26+ for shift managers. But wages haven't gone up by much, they did raise them after I left but only by a few dollars to be on par with what you could get elsewhere. In fact they actually CUT shift managers pay in 2020. Yeah- they CUT pay by $2/hr. Premium work deserves premium pay, and that just dried up over the last 2 years at ALDI. Just a few other negatives you should be aware of. (These could have changed since I left but as of December of 2020 these were the case) -There is no employee discount -There is no music in stores (though you can use headphones before the store opens) -The customers were VERY petty, sometimes arguing over amounts less than a dollar, and often times were degrading to the staff. -Was often very short staffed -Didn't have the best equipment (forklifts, scrubbers, scanners) -Some stores had very toxic workplace environments -Didn't give Christmas or holiday bonuses -DMs watched cameras to criticize employee performance and almost never to catch shoplifters -There is no way to get promoted to an easy job like main office, or district manager from stores Overall the job can be good. You learn a lot, you are really active, most mangers I had were good and genuinely cared about the staff. (your mileage may vary of course) I would actually recommend ALDI as a first job, especially if you were young or right outta highschool. Its also a good job if you gotta get back on your feet or want to work a lot of overtime. But I wouldnt make it your #1 choice, apply elsewhere if you can be picky, and if you want something easy or low stress I wouldn't bother- its a hard job and unless things have changed the upper management does not appreciate its hardworking employees. In my eyes they saw us as replaceable resources and didn't fight to keep longtime workers.

Advice to Management

My #1 suggestion would be to increase wages. By a lot. There's only 3 people on staff, whereas you go to a target and they have 30-50 people. I get the costs are lower at ALDI but not that much lower. The main reason I left was lack of monetary compensation. If I was paid for all my troubles I would probably still work there. My only other suggestion would be to re-vamp promotions, especially how you hire district managers. There should be a clear path to rising through the ladder and eventually becoming a Store Manager or especially a DM. I trusted my store mangers far more than the DM's; and for the most part the DMs were pretty useless. There were a few exceptions where I was like "wow this dude is on point s/he knows what's up" but from what I observed there for years there would be a lot more respect and less stress and fear if DMs were store managers that got promoted and had proven they can run a store for years. I know that DMT's get a store to run on their own for a trial period but that seemed like a formality more than anything.

Paid overtime, travel reimbursement for filling in at other stores (I was even put up in nice hotels when I traveled across the state), good co

18 January 2022

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27 July 2021

How are flexible working hours at ALDI?

Pros

The company has made many changes to help them get with the times such as flexible scheduling, less strict dress code and allowing hybrid work from home options. They pay way above average.

Cons

Buying Assistant roles are a lot of work. During the interview process they will be vague with what you will do in the role. Be prepared to wear a lot of different hats and be able to multi task.

Advice to Management

Allow Buying Assistants to get more commodity specific training before you turn everything over to them. Training needs to take 3 months, not 3 weeks.

The company has made many changes to help them get with the times such as flexible scheduling, less strict dress code and allowing hybrid work from home options.

27 July 2021

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6 English questions out of 6

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