Board of Innovation FAQ

All answers shown come directly from Board of Innovation Reviews and are not edited or altered.

12 English questions out of 12

12 January 2020

What kind of career opportunities exist at Board of Innovation?

Pros

Incredible opportunity to consult across industries and cultural contexts, while collaborating alongside a diverse, ambitious team.

Cons

At times, the company's entrepreneurial spirit can be chaotic.

Incredible opportunity to consult across industries and cultural contexts, while collaborating alongside a diverse, ambitious team.

12 January 2020

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18 August 2020

What are some insights into the strategy or vision at Board of Innovation?

Pros

• The team is very ambitious and confident to always find a way to make it work. • The speed to react on market changes is amazing (e.g. Low Touch Economy in reaction to COVID19) • Diverse and global projects • Responsibility and accountability are given rather quickly

Cons

Things can change fast to the extent that it might become hard to follow everything when working full time on projects.

Advice to Management

Keep on setting the strategic direction that makes us thrive through challenging times. It is inspiring to

• Responsibility and accountability are given rather quickly

18 August 2020

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2 August 2018

Does there seem to be diversity at Board of Innovation?

Pros

***Disclaimer: I chose to wrote an elaborate review, since that's just who I am.*** Grounded, humble and intentional: no egos, no intellectual blabla (okay some, we are consultants in the end :) ). Everyone is genuinely humble, it's probably due to our recruiting process (based on values besides experience). When a logical step in growth has arrived (e.g. timetracking when we doubled our team of consultants), any consulting firm would just introduce timetracking because it's now more about efficiency. Here, they pose the question if we really need it, what is the impact on the culture of it, and then decide against it. I know it sounds like common sense, but i've seen it go wrong so quickly, unintentionally in other firms. Possibility overload: working in many different industries, having that variety to avoid boredom and being able to learning continuously is why i became a consultant. I've done 20 projects in 1,5y for +/- 15 clients. From SME's to fortune 100, in Europe, US and even the Caribbean. On top of that, we have an innovation lab, a social project, and can decide to do whatever side project we think makes sense. For a person who easily gets over excited, like me, that can be a challenge as well :D Run it like its yours: at any time of day, you can check our financial health in real time, as you can see who applied recently and look up what our biggest sales are. There is (almost, not on wages for example) full transparency, so that you have all the info at your fingertips to make the right decisions. That way, just like an entrepreneur, you can decide what's best for the company instead of having to ask a superior. They take the value 'entrepreneurial' to a whole new level. Self-steering: you make your own decisions, based on an advice model (ask advice from those impacted and w expertise). Raise the bar: also leads to a lot of pressure to perform, but still one of my favorite things. Being able to work with the creme of the crop, and still be encouraged to keep on challenging them makes it world class. I was very surprised to learn that a small Belgian agency in my hometown was actually one of the top 10 world players in innovation. The office: yeahhh. Love the place. Beautiful design, airy, light. Sometimes work from home/meeting room to limit open office distractions. This year, we'll also experiment with a 2-week summer office! A castle in bordeaux, for which we all contribute a small fee, to work out of in the sunshine by the pool! Action-based: it's a company that really is strong in actually getting things done, moving innovation forward and not just inspiring people. BOI actually does it. BOIs: this is too cliché so almost left it out but here it goes: our team is #priceless. I enjoy working w so many nationalities, people with the craziest lifestories and just an open minded atmosphere tying that together. The founder are also actually in the office a lot, approachable and just plain brilliant. Reputation: I worked at big name companies before, which were multinationals that opened doors. I never thought a tiny company would have an even bigger impact, and open ever more doors. BOI really is a stamp of quality that is recognized worldwide and just propels your career forward.

Cons

High pressure: due to combination of high demand and self-regulation of workload. This is though for people like me who can' t set priorities. Took me 1 year and a lot of coaching from my colleagues to get under control. Major learning for me though. Growing pains: we went from unstructured startup chaos to organisationally designed circle structure, which is basically the same but formalised and more scalable. So it definitely feels unstructured still, which can be frustrating for junior people who need more structure. Senior people won't mind as much because they tend to enjoy the freedom that comes with this. Responsibilities: being entrepreneurial and able to make your own decisions also has its flip side. If you're like me, you take on way too many responsibilities and end up trying to get rid of some. Communication: we are figuring out how to communicate with a much bigger group than previously. Working in small teams (circles) allows for a high speed communication on team level, but on company level we haven't yet figured lean, meeting-light way of communication that fits our culture. we want to avoid having a standup for everything, are already overloaded on slack, etc. Challenging! One-size-fits-all? BOI works for me, but I see other personality types (I'm ENFP) struggle with parts of it. We try to attract other profiles more, to make sure we have better diversity, but I acknowledge it's still a weakness. A person who needs routine (like a colleague of mine) will struggle with ever-changing stuff, a person that is perfectionist (me) will struggle with the 'done-is-better-than-perfect' attitude, a person who is introverted (like a colleague of mine) might feel pressure from our outgoing group of colleagues. Flat hierarchy: great in practice, though for hiring. This makes for a career at BOI to most likely be +/- 4 years max, as people tend to want to grow vertically after some time. You can shift horizontally, but there's not really 'a way up'. Most of us don't mind that, but that's why a career here is typically a couple of years short. Lack of focus: we focus too much on efficiency, and too little on effectiveness. We are (now) an end-to-end consulting firm, while I feel we could have more impact if we focused on less activities.

Advice to Management

As communicated: Focus, focus, focus! Cliché as well, but I really believe a laser focus would make a huge difference. Communication: make sure information flows smoother in both ways, without compromising our culture.

We try to attract other profiles more, to make sure we have better diversity, but I acknowledge it's still a weakness.

2 August 2018

See answer

11 October 2020

How is management perceived at Board of Innovation?

Pros

- Fantastic colleagues that inspire personal & professional growth - Cool projects & diversified work

Cons

- Bad internal management - Very 'local' (all partners come from Antwerp and never worked anywhere else) despite being a global company. - Low pay

- Bad internal management

11 October 2020

See answer

2 August 2018

Is Board of Innovation a good company to work for?

Pros

***Disclaimer: I chose to wrote an elaborate review, since that's just who I am.*** Grounded, humble and intentional: no egos, no intellectual blabla (okay some, we are consultants in the end :) ). Everyone is genuinely humble, it's probably due to our recruiting process (based on values besides experience). When a logical step in growth has arrived (e.g. timetracking when we doubled our team of consultants), any consulting firm would just introduce timetracking because it's now more about efficiency. Here, they pose the question if we really need it, what is the impact on the culture of it, and then decide against it. I know it sounds like common sense, but i've seen it go wrong so quickly, unintentionally in other firms. Possibility overload: working in many different industries, having that variety to avoid boredom and being able to learning continuously is why i became a consultant. I've done 20 projects in 1,5y for +/- 15 clients. From SME's to fortune 100, in Europe, US and even the Caribbean. On top of that, we have an innovation lab, a social project, and can decide to do whatever side project we think makes sense. For a person who easily gets over excited, like me, that can be a challenge as well :D Run it like its yours: at any time of day, you can check our financial health in real time, as you can see who applied recently and look up what our biggest sales are. There is (almost, not on wages for example) full transparency, so that you have all the info at your fingertips to make the right decisions. That way, just like an entrepreneur, you can decide what's best for the company instead of having to ask a superior. They take the value 'entrepreneurial' to a whole new level. Self-steering: you make your own decisions, based on an advice model (ask advice from those impacted and w expertise). Raise the bar: also leads to a lot of pressure to perform, but still one of my favorite things. Being able to work with the creme of the crop, and still be encouraged to keep on challenging them makes it world class. I was very surprised to learn that a small Belgian agency in my hometown was actually one of the top 10 world players in innovation. The office: yeahhh. Love the place. Beautiful design, airy, light. Sometimes work from home/meeting room to limit open office distractions. This year, we'll also experiment with a 2-week summer office! A castle in bordeaux, for which we all contribute a small fee, to work out of in the sunshine by the pool! Action-based: it's a company that really is strong in actually getting things done, moving innovation forward and not just inspiring people. BOI actually does it. BOIs: this is too cliché so almost left it out but here it goes: our team is #priceless. I enjoy working w so many nationalities, people with the craziest lifestories and just an open minded atmosphere tying that together. The founder are also actually in the office a lot, approachable and just plain brilliant. Reputation: I worked at big name companies before, which were multinationals that opened doors. I never thought a tiny company would have an even bigger impact, and open ever more doors. BOI really is a stamp of quality that is recognized worldwide and just propels your career forward.

Cons

High pressure: due to combination of high demand and self-regulation of workload. This is though for people like me who can' t set priorities. Took me 1 year and a lot of coaching from my colleagues to get under control. Major learning for me though. Growing pains: we went from unstructured startup chaos to organisationally designed circle structure, which is basically the same but formalised and more scalable. So it definitely feels unstructured still, which can be frustrating for junior people who need more structure. Senior people won't mind as much because they tend to enjoy the freedom that comes with this. Responsibilities: being entrepreneurial and able to make your own decisions also has its flip side. If you're like me, you take on way too many responsibilities and end up trying to get rid of some. Communication: we are figuring out how to communicate with a much bigger group than previously. Working in small teams (circles) allows for a high speed communication on team level, but on company level we haven't yet figured lean, meeting-light way of communication that fits our culture. we want to avoid having a standup for everything, are already overloaded on slack, etc. Challenging! One-size-fits-all? BOI works for me, but I see other personality types (I'm ENFP) struggle with parts of it. We try to attract other profiles more, to make sure we have better diversity, but I acknowledge it's still a weakness. A person who needs routine (like a colleague of mine) will struggle with ever-changing stuff, a person that is perfectionist (me) will struggle with the 'done-is-better-than-perfect' attitude, a person who is introverted (like a colleague of mine) might feel pressure from our outgoing group of colleagues. Flat hierarchy: great in practice, though for hiring. This makes for a career at BOI to most likely be +/- 4 years max, as people tend to want to grow vertically after some time. You can shift horizontally, but there's not really 'a way up'. Most of us don't mind that, but that's why a career here is typically a couple of years short. Lack of focus: we focus too much on efficiency, and too little on effectiveness. We are (now) an end-to-end consulting firm, while I feel we could have more impact if we focused on less activities.

Advice to Management

As communicated: Focus, focus, focus! Cliché as well, but I really believe a laser focus would make a huge difference. Communication: make sure information flows smoother in both ways, without compromising our culture.

That way, just like an entrepreneur, you can decide what's best for the company instead of having to ask a superior.

2 August 2018

See answer
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12 English questions out of 12