G4S Compliance & Investigations FAQ

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3 English questions out of 3

27 February 2020

What is a typical working day like at G4S Compliance & Investigations?

Pros

You get some downtime during working your cases. You get experience in criminal justice if you're struggling to get your foot in the door.

Cons

But some claimants will not leave until late evening hours. So if you start at 6 am you could be working until 6 pm and then have to get up for a shift at 6 am the next day. And most of the time these cities are much further from where you live. Like an hour out or possibly more. You have one day off in the week which makes things more complicated. So to say the least if you choose to work here you will have no social life.

Advice to Management

Stick with 8 to 9 hour shifts and don't make your employees work overtime every single day. Respect your employees and give them at least two days off in the week.

So if you start at 6 am you could be working until 6 pm and then have to get up for a shift at 6 am the next day.

27 February 2020

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19 October 2019

What is the work environment like at G4S Compliance & Investigations?

Pros

A few (very few) good case managers. A few good investigators.

Cons

Micromanaged by case managers and/or clients. Experienced investigators are handcuffed by ridiculous protocols. Cut from cases scheduled for 8 hours but if no activity from 6am to 10am, the day is over, even on the very first day of a case . Then the follow up days have a "throw a dart at the wall" start times. This is not investigating, it's a warm body to watch a house at periodic times in hopes that the right guess was made for the start time. This strategy seriously hampers results and greatly affects the investigator's weekly pay. Investigators with over 15 years experience are routinely ignored or talked down to when it comes to strategy or recommendations. Someone behind a desk who only counts numbers, apparently knows better. Despite the provided gas card, the small vehicle stipend is the same whether you drive 200 miles in a week or a 1000 miles in a week and it's not nearly enough. Guaranteed the miles are almost always closer to 1000 per week. With this setup, you can not claim your mileage on your taxes. But guess who can claim the stipend and gas (if not paid for by client to G4S) on their taxes. You WILL drive your vehicle into the ground. Investigators are expected to get results, even those new to the industry, despite the constant lack of information or flat out inaccurate information provided by the client. This is blatantly obvious when new cases are given to case managers but very few, if any, attempt to verify or obtain needed information from the client prior to sending an investigator out to a case. An experienced investigator may be able to overcome the lack of information during the first day of surveillance, but by the time it is all figured out, the claimant has already departed their actual address/residence resulting in a "no video" day for which the investigator then receives a lower grade. Often times when the investigator contacts the client to verify/obtain additional information, the client had it all along but forgot to include it. To get a raise, you must move mountains. Does not matter if you are a long term investigator who routinely gets top results. For those who don't get good numbers, the reason will be "raises are performance based", and if you do get good numbers, the reason will be "G4S is not giving out raises across the board". Routinely working cases into the evening, getting home at 9pm or 10pm, doing all the admin work by 11am or 12pm, then having to get up at 4:30am to get to the next days case.

Advice to Management

Loyalty begets loyalty. Constantly training new investigators instead of paying experienced ones what they deserve, is not cost effective. All case managers should spend a minimum of 3 to 5 days of surveillance per year working with an investigator to understand the obstacles presented on a daily basis, especially when it's a lack of information. Investigators with at least 5 years experience should be able to grade case managers as they do us.

Routinely working cases into the evening, getting home at 9pm or 10pm, doing all the admin work by 11am or 12pm, then having to get up at 4:30am to get to the next days case.

19 October 2019

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2 January 2020

What are working conditions like at G4S Compliance & Investigations?

Pros

Can make pretty good entry level money Some days are shorter than others Essentially, own boss Paid to travel to places Company Gas Card

Cons

Heavy Workload Sit in car all day Own Vehicle miles used No set schedule One corporate office (in Raleigh)

Advice to Management

More interconnection with employees will reduce in confusion to management.

One corporate office (in Raleigh)

2 January 2020

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3 English questions out of 3