Gordon Food Service FAQ

All answers shown come directly from Gordon Food Service Reviews and are not edited or altered.

35 English questions out of 35

31 August 2020

What is health insurance like at Gordon Food Service?

Pros

No Saturdays, good health insurance (plan on working Sundays)

Cons

A lot of work for not much pay. Direct supervisor gave little to no direction and showed no effort or support in helping new sales succeed. Many sales people working 60+ hours a week and not making nearly enough money for their time.

Advice to Management

Get more involved

No Saturdays, good health insurance (plan on working Sundays)

31 August 2020

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11 December 2020

Does Gordon Food Service pay for a gym membership?

Pros

Good benefits They have a gym in the building with free access Employee engagement is high as they have lots of fun inter-office games (murder mysteries, Halloween & Christmas decorating, music video contests) Awesome HR department

Cons

Poor pay relative to other organizations Severely incompetent leadership Significant nepotism and favoritism Overall, a poorly performing organization Drab office atmosphere Terrible financial controls So much to say about such a toxic workplace. I worked at GFS for 3.5 years and my position gave me a view into many areas of the business. Our department had the displeasure of working with the CGY, EDM and WIN locations and it's appalling what counts as acceptable leadership and performance. I didn't meet a single leader in sales who was capable of objective or critical thought and the confirmation bias exhibited by them was astonishing. Every customer had lots of potential and was a 'great' customer regardless of their payment history or credit score. The business is entirely focused on getting product out the door, with little to zero consideration as to whether or not any particular decision is profitable. On multiple occasions, we had customers who explicitly told us they couldn’t pay, yet we continued to ship them product. There was a well-known brewery in Alberta that we had sent to collections twice and hadn’t yet paid us back. A sales manager recommended we open another account for them because he thought it was ‘a really good opportunity’ even though the owner was nearing personal bankruptcy and the brewery was in arrears with other suppliers. It shouldn’t come as a surprise that we sent them to collections for a third time not even two months after opening their account. The company performs at a terribly low standard. I was involved in two large scale software upgrades and both were disasters. After we went live with one of the upgrades, our payment processing department accidentally double charged a customer’s credit card tens of thousands of dollars. Not that big of a deal if you can quickly reverse the transaction, but they weren’t able to credit the funds back until one month later. When questioned about the delay, they said they hadn’t yet trained themselves how to do refunds. So, you go-live with your new software even though you haven’t learned critical functions? Don’t worry, it gets better. We rolled out a new payment processing platform and below are just a handful of the many issues: We kept advancing to the next phase of the rollout even though prior phases weren’t complete and a multitude of issues were noted. Because of the issues, customers were requested to contact the Help Desk, but the Help Desk wasn’t even notified (let alone trained) about the new payment platform. Although my department was tasked with helping the customers get set up, we were given no training at all. We’d be on the phone with a customer and they’d say “I see this on the screen, what do I do?” Naturally, we hadn’t a clue as we had no training. You may be thinking “why didn’t you just practise on the platform?” Good question: we were never given access to the platform to begin with. We worked for ages with one customer trying to set up their AMEX on the platform. Prior to the rollout, we charged their card without issue. Several in person trips to their restaurant and multiple calls to the Help Desk didn’t solve the issue. Then, we were told that the system wasn’t coded for AMEX because NOBODY ON THE ROLLOUT TEAM BOTHERED TO CONFIRM let alone test any payments with AMEX. The second rollout we had just as bad as the first. One week prior to go-live, there was a blackout on any customer changes to customer data. About a month after go-live, we were told that they actually took the customer data as of two months prior to the go-live date. Naturally, we made thousands of changes to customer accounts during these two months and all were wiped out. Most were changes to shipping addresses and bank accounts. Of course, we delivered many shipments to the wrong address and withdrew funds from incorrect bank accounts. I’m sure you can imagine the storm that ensued. The blowback from these failed upgrades was remarkable. And yet, there was no discussion whatsoever about how to improve the next time around. It was such a stressful time going through these two rollouts, but I look back at it now and can’t help but laugh at how poorly the company and its leaders performed in the execution of the upgrade implementations. Drab office atmosphere The atmosphere in the office is very dull. They have this disgusting fabric office furniture with more stains than a toddler’s shirt after eating spaghetti. I wish I could post the pictures. The worst part of this is they regularly brought customers around our office space and it was degrading seeing the looks on their faces as they walked by our desks. I would not recommend the office environment at GFS to anyone. Can't say much about the Warehouse or Transportation departments but everything I’ve heard about the two is that they perform at a high level. It begs the question how one department can perform at a high level and another perform so disastrously. If you do choose to work there, I offer a piece of advice: do not, under any circumstances, criticize anyone for any reason. Seriously. Regardless if you are 100% correct and multiple people agree with you, do not make your true feelings known. You will be labelled as having an attitude that is ‘not the Gordon way.’ Accept that no leader at GFS ever makes a bad decision. Even if their decisions result in immense failure, stay positive and do what many of the leaders do when something goes wrong: blame negative results on something/someone else (i.e. chance, the weather, unforeseen circumstances, etc.). If you’re the type of person that doesn’t care about incompetent leadership and wants an easy job with a paycheque, then GFS may be suitable for you. You just need to recognize your standards and be willing to adjust them downwards.

Advice to Management

None. Senior management knows they do not care about opinions they disagree with.

They have a gym in the building with free access

11 December 2020

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13 January 2021

Does Gordon Food Service offer unlimited holiday?

Pros

Wonderful company, great management and coworkers. Appropriate amount of training and continued education. Unlimited interdepartmental support.

Cons

Must use personal cell phone which means customers have access to you at all times.

Unlimited interdepartmental support.

13 January 2021

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20 December 2018

What is the retirement plan like at Gordon Food Service?

Pros

Strong company culture is dedicated to taking care of employees and customers. Pay is above average. Benefits are great. The 401k is better than most. We offer a 4% match and year end profit-sharing contributions.

Cons

Company is growing quickly and taking on a lot of new accounts. While this is great for our business, it can be tough to balance priorities.

The 401k is better than most.

20 December 2018

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11 July 2019

Does Gordon Food Service have a pension plan?

Pros

Good benefits and pension plan

Cons

Office pay isn't as high as operations

Good benefits and pension plan

11 July 2019

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35 English questions out of 35