Little Dot Studios Diversity And Inclusion FAQ

Read what Little Dot Studios employees think about diversity and inclusion at the company, and if their workforce is comprised and supportive of individuals of varying gender, ethnicity, age, sexual orientation, religion and other attributes.

Little Dot Studios has a diversity rating of 4.2.

All answers shown come directly from Little Dot Studios Reviews and are not edited or altered.

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2 English questions out of 2

7 September 2021

Does there seem to be diversity at Little Dot Studios?

Pros

The company have refined their values in the last year and have put a large amount of work into their people team with training, development, diversity, inclusion and equity becoming part of the culture. As an organisation, it's been great to grow alongside them as they go from strength to strength.

Cons

There can often feel like there's a disconnect across the various sections of the business as the company is pretty expansive, so at times it's difficult to know what other teams do, see what they are working on and collaborate as they can feel quite insular.

The company have refined their values in the last year and have put a large amount of work into their people team with training, development, diversity, inclusion and equity becoming part of the culture.

7 September 2021

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17 September 2019

How is race or ethnicity talked about at Little Dot Studios?

Pros

- If you start work as a new grad - as many of us did - it's overall a friendly, young (20s) atmosphere, similar to university. - you get thrown straight in, so can learn a lot very quickly. - we all know it's hard to get jobs in the media industry, and because this is digital, it's perhaps an easier route in. - working here for 6 - 12 months could give you the demonstratable digital/production/general industry skills you need to apply for better companies.

Cons

- I read the other glassdoor reviews for LDS before starting this review, and I think others have already summed this up very well: LDS is poorly organised, and largely succeeds due to the skills and goodwill of entry-level or lower-level employees, who often do great work for very little pay or recognition. One of those reviews was written over a year ago and it feels like nothing has changed in this respect. - There is virtually no career development or further training. Those who push for development either end up getting frustrated and leave for other companies, or have to wait years before getting acknowledged, with no actual guarantee that a promotion will come. There is no clear system in place regarding training or promotions - it's all very 'keep going! keep working! maybe one day you'll get there!' which is obviously... not helpful if you care at all about your career, or earning a livable wage. (The entry-level wage is really not enough to live in London - many employees have to live with their parents, or receive top-up money from their parents if they don't come from the greater London regions.) - New starters may not receive any formal training at all and have to rely on the person sitting next to them. It really depends on your team though - I think some managers are more interested in supporting their teams than others. Some managers will actively avoid directly supporting their teams as much as possible, and get uncomfortable when obliged to do so. - Another reviewer on glassdoor talked about a destructive, shallow 'matey' culture, especially across higher management, which is definitely still the case. Everyone is expected to be chill and fun, but when concerns are raised about anything to do with the structure or culture of the company, senior managers appear more interested in smothering the issues and maintaining the 'good vibes' than investigating whether changes need to be made. From incidents I'm aware of, it feels like women and those hailing from minority demographics may be hit hardest by this attitude.

Advice to Management

Enforce actual clear structures for career development and further training and communicate them clearly to all employees. Identify your bad eggs in higher levels of management and let them go. When managers lack basic management skills and rely on confidently BSing their way through their roles, this needs to be recognised and dealt with, especially as this often results in talented employees getting fed up and leaving the company. Plenty (perhaps all) of your employees are aware of the 'lads' group at the top of LDS management and how they will always protect their own. Actively seek the concerns of your employees and take them seriously or they will continue to push back or leave. If you started doing anonymous exit interviews and asked the harder questions regarding the conduct of senior managers, you would probably learn much more about why the LDS turnover rate is much higher than it should be.

From incidents I'm aware of, it feels like women and those hailing from minority demographics may be hit hardest by this attitude.

17 September 2019

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2 English questions out of 2

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