Lowe's FAQ

All answers shown come directly from Lowe's Reviews and are not edited or altered.

54 English questions out of 54

28 June 2020

Does Lowe's offer housing assistance?

Pros

Paid housing, pretty collaborative company environment. I really enjoyed interning with my team since they made sure I had a meaningful project and would be able to learn from it.

Cons

Some other interns expressed they didn't have anything to do/didn't know what was going on with their projects.. but may just be the wonky virtual setting this year. Also, not a fan of 8-5 work with an unpaid lunch that you clock out for (this is for interns though, not sure about full-time)

Paid housing, pretty collaborative company environment.

28 June 2020

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15 February 2020

Does Lowe's offer disability insurance?

Pros

The pay is on par with much of the retail world for the majority of staff. Management pay scales graduate nicely as one moves up in positions and responsibility. Depending on the management team at the store level, working can be reasonable and sometimes fun -- this is largely personality-driven. As most positions are public-facing, how one treats the customers will largely be reflected in how one receives treatment back. And while it is easier to post the negatives (see below), the positives certainly exist and make this retail environment better than some. Lowes does largely offer a wide variety of opportunities to the sufficiently self-motivated. It does take a self-motivated individual to excel, though. Retirement (401k), healthcare options (HDHP/HSA and traditional), dental, optical, long-term disability, life insurance, employee stock purchase programs, 10% employee purchase discount, paid sick leave, vacation and paid holiday (5) are all above-average extras for retail. Depending on one's schedule, an hour unpaid lunch and two 15 min paid breaks to a day. Most managers and supervisors work hard to accommodate unexpected life events and quality-of-life calendars with scheduling, 'though it is a retail hour rotation for many floor staff. And Lowes remains excellent in respecting both Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day by being closed. Finally, Lowes is a leader is respecting our military with 10% off for service members (abuse of this program has lead to ID checks to keep the dishonorable from cheating legit military). To be fair -- there is a LOT of criticism and shade thrown below. Marvin has only had 1.5 years to fix things, and some have been excellent. The mess his predecessor left is now his to resolve. So while he's not to blame for the past, he and his will be full on owners of what the future brings.

Cons

Staffing and 'raises' for the non-management population seems to follow the tired 1980s business management school mindset. There are no merit raises; store management will claim it is out of their hands. Everyone gets the same COLA until they cap out after x number of years. If store traffic is light, rather than use the staff to stock/clean/improve the store, management is encourages to 'cut hours' and send staff home as a meager cost savings. Customers will feel this effect immediately, with insufficient floor coverage and assistance. Not to mention most staff actually rely upon the paycheck to cover living expenses, and being forced off the clock immediately impacts their ability to live. This generates a negative feedback where the employee will be less motivated to support the store and customers -- such resentment is a logical result job being treated so marginally. A great example is during the holidays when, after annual attrition, permanent full or part-time positions are filled. The new staff enjoy some days or weeks on the floor, but find their hours drastically cut when toward the end of the holiday season, customer traffic meters down. Why would someone wish to take a part-time job for 20 hrs a week, and want to stay with a company when they say 'sorry, we only have 8 hours to offer you this week (or less)? How is it efficient or cost-effective to hire, then train, floor personnel, only to drive them away by shorting the hours. These individuals are being paid the lowest of their class (being new), and still require many hours of floor time to become competent in their assignments, tasks, and customer/staff support skills. They could be put to work in a hundred different ways that would support and improve the store and the customer experience. Seems the only lever corporate gives facilities managers is the 'cut hours' tool. All this really does is disappoint the 'fewer' customers that do shop with us. The dissatisfied customer leaves the store empty-handed and convinced they should have shopped somewhere else first. That's a lasting lost far more costly to the store than paying part-time staff some extra hours/wk. This is American retail -- not just Lowes. Dear Consumer -- is this what you want for your dirt-cheap products? Dear Stock Holder -- is this worth your quarterly numbers, or do you seek long-term success?

Advice to Management

Get out of the 1980s. Stop thinking that copying your old employer (HD, perhaps), you'll make Lowes better than the competition. Rather than use slogans of 'good to great' or Lowes 2.0, make it great by thinking outside of the box (store) model: Give more incentives for both the entire store and individual employees by giving store management (or warehouse management, or call center, or the worker bees at corporate) merit raise tools as a positive reinforcement mechanism for performers who outshine average or 'expectations'. Even a $0.10 or $0.20/hr unexpected raise outside of the semi-annual COLA for a job consistently well-done will pay itself back in even better attitude and performance -- and that can be contagious within a facility or show in customer care. Pay better. The COLA model adopted for the past few years doesn't even keep up with inflation. There are retail stores that knock it out of the park when it comes to customer satisfaction. Companies such as Apple and Chick-fil-A pay well above average -- giving their staff reason to be rabidly loyal and abundantly positive with their engagement for their job responsibilities. These examples can charge more for their products/services because their customers feel that energy from the staff, are drawn toward 'better than average', and the customers spend more as a result. Willingly. Lowes is missing a psychological boon to improving the customer experience by chiseling and going cheap on the employee experience. Are Apple or Chick-fil-A reasonable successful firms (like Lowes)? No -- they are best-in-class, unlike the current Lowes. Lowes gave a pathetic one-off 'bonus' when the recent tax bill went through, giving the corporation a hefty annual tax break. And Lowes only did it when other retailers had stepped forward ahead of them (HD, Target and others) -- seemed like Lowes mgmt only did this when the ABSENCE of such a move was glaringly obvious from Lowes silence. If Lowes employees are truly the most important asset, senior management sure has a weird way of demonstrating this. Lowes didn't give every employee a raise -- a money move much more important in the long-term to staff. Lowes gave a one-off minor dollar amount. $75, $150, $300, $500. Whatever it was (based on tenure), it cost Lowes pennies compared to the tax savings. Paying out $50mil or $60mil ONCE for a $5Bil+ PER YEAR tax windfall is simply cheap. Do the math. Did mgmt plow $5Bil back into IT infrastructure, or revamp freight flow to make it modern and efficient? Are the computer and POS systems up to the task of modern sales and customer support? Seems the tax windfall went where one would expect in a short-term thinking society: stock buybacks to prop up a Wall Street valuation. Yes, the owners (stock holders) deserve some profit-sharing with a windfall. But responsible owners will look to spending such largess on their best assets first to insure long-term performance and profitability. That, dear C-suiters and BOD, are the ground troops that make Lowes actually work. A $1/hr raise would have cost 10x the one-off bonus, but would have meant vastly more to your 200,000 minions. Yes, it would have taken ONLY 10% of your annual tax break differential to make that change. And imagine the draw to the stores and warehouses for better talent when the world discovers senior management pays all of its staff better than most of our competitors. Imagine the power store and support facility management would have to keep talent. In an environment of historically low unemployment, where obtaining new personnel with skills or potential to shine is nearly nonexistent, local and regional managers would have the flexibility of trimming off underperformers, knowing better suiters are in the wings, willing to jump ship from their mediocre employers to a top-tier alternative. Imagine the true stock holder/owners who seek long-term foundational improvement -- these owners would see real value in their shares over the current buy-back accounting gimmicks. Seriously -- when Lowes hires a cashier at $9.25/hr, and keeps them at that pay scale until the next semiannual 1% COLA, are you going to retain staff when Amazon is starting box stuffers at $15/hr down the street? Hey Shareholder: what kind of staff do you think you can attract and keep, in the MOST customer-facing position in a store? Is this how you put your best foot forward? Is this being exceptional? Dear Customer, we'd like to apologize for our corporate senior management & board of directors bending to the whims of stock owners shorting our staff and your experience with us today. We've hired only the best barely above minimum wage to bring you the most economical products at the cheapest prices so we look good when the (stock) market closes. This is how we delivery enhanced value. And after 30+ years of chasing our large orange competitor in terms of 'value' in our retail space, we have stubbornly remained at HALF their value. We'll keep doing the same tired thing, expecting different results with every annual stock holders meeting. In short, management could invest differently in the company -- pay better to get better. Management could stop band-aiding existing tired systems, and pay for a real IT infrastructure change (even if it was simply running to SAP or a similar off-the-shelf solution and pull the trigger. Management could share the profit bounty of tax breaks and net profit with staff more. Management could discourage the knee-jerk hour cutting (make better use of staff when traffic is light to improve the store environment instead). Management could better incentivize to energize a dynamic worker base who frankly deserves to be part of the winning they support. Management could even charge a bit more for our product lines if we can figure out tools to energize our staff to be rabidly excited to be part of the blue gable. It remains to be seen if the highest levels of management has the imagination -- or will they continue with yet another decade of business-as-usual.

Retirement (401k), healthcare options (HDHP/HSA and traditional), dental, optical, long-term disability, life insurance, employee stock purchase programs, 10% employee purchase discount, paid sick leave, vacation and paid holiday (5) are all above-average extras for retail.

15 February 2020

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16 August 2018

What is the retirement plan like at Lowe's?

Pros

great team, customer care culture, reasonable health benefits, 401k match and ESPP at a 15% discount.

Cons

pay, pay, pay. raises are pathetic. negotiate a good starting salary

Advice to Management

pay attention to your employees. yes everybody is replaceable but look at the lost opportunity in sales and customer goodwill.

great team, customer care culture, reasonable health benefits, 401k match and ESPP at a 15% discount.

16 August 2018

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17 August 2020

How are senior leaders perceived at Lowe's?

Pros

Good leadership, culture and benefits

Cons

Retail hours can put a strain on work/life balance

Good leadership, culture and benefits

17 August 2020

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11 December 2018

What are some insights into the strategy or vision at Lowe's?

Pros

Great people, smart and talented Passion for the company's purpose and customer Many opportunities to advance career

Cons

Unstable environment strategy direction changes, lots of turnover among the leadership and then layoffs ensue. Must be resilient to thrive here.

Advice to Management

Continue to build on the purpose and keep it entral to the strategy. More discipline in the strategy and how the brand is presented to customers.

Unstable environment strategy direction changes, lots of turnover among the leadership and then layoffs ensue.

11 December 2018

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54 English questions out of 54