Unilever Compensation FAQ

Read what Unilever employees think about their compensation at the company.

Unilever has a compensation and benefits rating of 3.8. If you want to know how much Unilever employees make, head to their Salaries page to see a list of salaries per occupation, along with bonuses.

All answers shown come directly from Unilever Reviews and are not edited or altered.

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9 English questions out of 9

10 November 2020

What is the salary like at Unilever?

Pros

Good pay, work from home

Cons

High organisational politics. Low rate of promotions.

Good pay, work from home

10 November 2020

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30 January 2020

Does Unilever offer a monthly bonus?

Pros

- Training - Shop discount - Great line managers - Performance related bonus - Paid weekly

Cons

Sometimes a lot of responsibility to you based on your ability. This is great, but might be overwhelming for some.

Advice to Management

Slightly more support with changing line managers due to maternity leave.

Performance related bonus

30 January 2020

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30 January 2020

Does Unilever offer a weekly bonus?

Pros

- Training - Shop discount - Great line managers - Performance related bonus - Paid weekly

Cons

Sometimes a lot of responsibility to you based on your ability. This is great, but might be overwhelming for some.

Advice to Management

Slightly more support with changing line managers due to maternity leave.

Paid weekly

30 January 2020

See answer

19 October 2020

What are other benefits and incentives like at Unilever?

Pros

Culture & values (probably best of any organisation I have worked at) Unilever Sustainable Living Plan (USLP) Brands & associated budgets Flexibility with working from home Mostly friendly, supportive & non-hierarchical atmosphere Less so than it used to be but still a pretty well regarded scheme & CV name Training quality mixed but some excellent, and Unilever will invest financially in this area From Director level on some really excellent people Unilever Leadership Executive Responsibility Work life balance Concern for well-being & mental health At points work produced can be some of industry's best Focus on purpose Learnt a lot through scheme

Cons

- Compensation; compensation; compensation (there is a reason every review mentions it)! Unilever pays at or below median pay level below Director level and top quartile of the industry at Director level and above. Downgrading pay of roles to lower position with original higher workload is common. Don't exploit people's desire to do good with lower pay - Too slow (absolute minimum 3 years) to get first promotion up to management level - even for exceptional talent. Categories which have higher levels of employees applying/demand are even slower to get promoted in - Occasional dishonesty & goal post moving around promotion timings/pay - Promotion process for grads coming off the scheme is unstructured and unintelligent: primarily driven by CV and interview performance (which studies show are not good indicators of performance) vs. years of manager & peer reviews (which studies show are good indicators of performance). Some "vacancies" are impossible to get as there are preferred candidates, meaning in reality no one else can get them and this is not transparent. Some vacancies at a certain work level only open to that existing work levels due to the workload of those roles (so impossible to get "promoted") - Office location (Leatherhead) is a pure cost cutting measure for Unilever at employees' expense: both time & money. Commutes of 2-3 hours a day for employees common. In fairness to Unilever plan to move to Kingston will alleviate somewhat - Next to no incentive to produce excellent work at a lower level: time based system for promotion on grad scheme (3 years) means performance has little impact on progression as long as you are "good enough" and difference in pay between being one of the best and worst both in fixed pay and bonus is negligible - Asymmetrical cost cutting approach - miserly in some areas (pay & bonus) and needlessly extravagant in others (away days and summer party for CD) - Different functions get different perks regardless of quality e.g. sales function get four quarterly away days a year, essentially four extra paid days of holiday, whilst no one else does - Slow but constant erosion of benefits (sadly common in many companies) e.g. bonuses; ability work to abroad; massive pension cut (which was only leading part of Unilever remuneration package) - So big you spend a lot of time learning Unilever, not necessarily skills or your function - Lack of leadership training - In reality, simply not enough manager (2A) positions for all the grads - Not Unilever, nature of FMCG, but work itself often of low significance - though Unilever answers better than anyone with USLP

Advice to Management

- Improve pay. You should not have to work for the company for 10+ years and become a Director in order to be paid fairly, given that you ask for the best talent and work in the industry (and often get it) you should pay properly for it at all levels. Pay affects staff turnover & morale. Baubles like gym membership and occasional takeaway expenses are nice but do not make up for systemically lower pay - Make it a company that really rewards exceptional work and performance, even at a lower level. Create incentives for great work. Why not have the scheme shorter for the best grads? Or ensure best performers promoted first? Grad pay should be more tailored according to performance and beyond cursory amounts. Huge variety of quality in graduates (some outstanding; some mediocre) but reward almost exactly the same - with only approximately 3-4% difference in pay max between being best & very worst in your year. - Graduate scheme is too long - you can get promoted faster at other FMCG schemes which are less competitive to get onto - Have promotions more driven by actual work performance and calibration, not interviews & CV. It is ludicrous & massively demotivating that less good grads can occasionally get promoted faster than their more capable peers who did better on the scheme (as well as against Unilever's interests) - Focus as much on keeping grads on the scheme as you do getting them onto it - Have more structure for how grads roll off scheme - Placements mostly good, but you can get stuck in a poor placement which can make a year unpleasant and minimise learning. Think more in advance about which placements are right and, crucially, if managers are the right kind of person for a grad. Doing "same rotations as last year" not always right - More scrutiny on whether managers are good to their reports, and not just on whether they are good performers. Some are bad and no consequence for that - Coronavirus promotion & pay freeze could have been better handled. You should still have allowed people to get promoted even with the temporary pay freeze; you did not need to remove all promotion opportunities as well (especially given how long the grad scheme already was)

Next to no incentive to produce excellent work at a lower level: time based system for promotion on grad scheme (3 years) means performance has little impact on progression as long as you are "good enough" and difference in pay between being one of the best and worst both in fixed pay and bonus is negligible

19 October 2020

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13 November 2018

Does Unilever offer a yearly bonus?

Pros

Flexible working and good life balance. Diverse cultural teams. Many innovation projects meeting people around the world. Good annual bonus.

Cons

Very disorganised multinational company. Dots are not connected, which makes following up activities and projects very hard, with many times not receiving even an answer to an specific query. Changing global R&D strategy every few months which complicates current Ways of Working and people feel lost and not knowing which their roles or responsibilities are anymore.

Advice to Management

If a new strategic approach is going to be made, it should be thought thoroughly and making it clear how it will affect to employees. Not only how much benefit ti will give to the company.

Good annual bonus.

13 November 2018

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9 English questions out of 9