easyJet Culture FAQ

Read what easyJet employees think about their company culture and make sure it is the right fit for you.

easyJet has a culture and values rating of 4.1.

All answers shown come directly from easyJet Reviews and are not edited or altered.

What is the hiring process like at easyJet?

2 English reviews out of 2

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11 February 2020

Pros

- Onboarding process was easy and simple - Great benefits - Great brand - Innovative company - People love working for easyJet - Working in easyJet holidays feels like a startup but connected to one of the best airline brands

Cons

- Not enough office space (not a proper con, and the new office is on its way) - Some processes can slow things down a bit

Onboarding process was easy and simple

11 February 2020

Reviewed by: Senior Campaign Manager in Luton, East of England, England, England (Current Employee)

5 January 2019

Pros

Size of company means lots of positions and opportunities for progression. Slightly above industry average pay. A few very passionate and lovely people here and there at all levels (albeit not enough). Ex-EZY crew might just be some of the most resilient and hard working in the world.

Cons

Sole priority is shareholder dividends creating toxic profit-centric culture that sends a torrent of bullying and bureaucracy downwards. End result passengers are treated like cattle and only dysfunctional individuals who love drama tend to stay on. Decent crew face a bewildering network of obstacles if they attempt to do a good job. The few good people they have literally hold up the company like the Greek God Atlas used to hold up the earth. When you attempt to report a safety issue at LGW you are treated like the sole cause of the problem and are then placed under microscopic scrutiny and fired for the most trivial breach of the labyrinthine network of rules. A cynic might speculate the rules are made complex to facilitate this process. At some points I considered going directly to the Civil Aviation Authority with my concerns but the realisation that I would probably end up in court defeated my resolve to do the right thing. To give an example of managements incompetence: There was an ongoing issue with batteries in the hand held sales terminals going flat due to age. Three years went by and this wasn’t resolved. A phone call to the manufacturer revealed that I could have, personally, with my own credit card, sorted out half the aircraft at my base in about 7 days. Yet, the company would rather convene committees and sub-committees to scratch their heads, draft reports, find blame and create bureaucratic quick sand everywhere than actually just buy some new damn batteries. One time they had crew bringing toilet rolls from home because a dispute with a supplier was leaving their aircraft with no toilet paper and cabin crew were sick of the unhygienic conditions it created and the generally {censored} working environment. There is a book by economics professor David Graeber (title of which I cannot say, google it) that explains the flaws of companies like easyJet perfectly and would have helped me avoid this hell on earth company if I’d have read it earlier.

Advice to Management

The fact that you had to fire a load of people because of an Orgy on a bus at a company rewards event is somewhat telling. The only people capable of giving you the advice you need are the ones you hold in the highest contempt because your egos simply prevent you from interpreting reality in a helpful way. We could literally engrave a list of the company problems on the tip of a Tungsten artillery shell, load it into a cannon, fire it up your noses and you still wouldn’t take notice. Senior captain once told me the only practical solution would be a company wide purge of 90% of all managers.

A cynic might speculate the rules are made complex to facilitate this process.

5 January 2019

Reviewed by: Cabin Crew in Gatwick, England, England (Former Employee)

2 English reviews out of 2

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