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Rolls-Royce Derby, England Reviews

3.8
Star Star Star Star Star
Rating Trends Rating Trends

Employees rate Derby 4.9% higher than the overall average

  • "Performance Engineer"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Derby, England
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Derby, England
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    Pros

    Large variety of roles and projects across a multitude of functions. Flexible working hours and very diverse workforce.

    Cons

    Decisions can take too long to be effective

See All Reviews

Rolls-Royce Derby, England Jobs

  • Manufacturing Engineer - Purchase
    Rolls-Royce
    Rolls-Royce
    Derby, England
    14 hr
  • Control and Monitoring Sub-System Safety Engineer
    Rolls-Royce
    Rolls-Royce
    Derby, England
    18 hr
  • Operations Manager
    Rolls-Royce
    Rolls-Royce
    Derby, England
    18 hr

Rolls-Royce Derby, England Salaries

Salaries in £ (GBP)
Average
Min
Max
£27,885 per year
£27k
£30k
£27,885 per year
£27k
£30k
£28,367 per year
£27k
£35k
£28,367 per year
£27k
£35k
£17,618 per year
£18k
£18k
£17,618 per year
£18k
£18k

Rolls-Royce Derby, England Interviews

Experience

Experience
81%
12%
6%

Getting an Interview

Getting an Interview
89%
2%
2%
2
1
1
0

Difficulty

3.6
Average

Difficulty

Hard
Average
Easy
  1.  

    Engineering(Summer) Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Derby, England
    No Offer
    Positive Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied online. The process took 5+ months. I interviewed at Rolls-Royce (Derby, England) in May 2017.

    Interview

    I was placed on the reserve list.

    Applied online towards the end of December just before the position closed and had to take an online test. Upon completion, I was told I'd been invited to the assessment centre and that they would call, but I did not hear from them again until just a week before the interview, so don't worry if they don't get back to you because you will still get the interview. Other candidates said they'd had to do a phone interview but this was not the case for me.

    On the day you take part in:

    A numerical reasoning test (similar to the online test to verify that you didn't get someone else to do it for you). It's negative marking for wrong answers so it pays to make sure you're getting the ones you answer right.

    A presentation about yourself followed by a competency interview. Both of these were with just one assessor and the whole thing is very relaxed. You're allowed to sit for the presentation, so it comes off more as a regular interview session than a gruelling presentation. The competency interview regards your ability to work as part of a team and your understanding of what the company does. The assessors are very friendly so there's no need to get worked up about this.

    A group exercise with a few other candidates. Speaking to the assessors afterwards, it seems that they set a task which is purposely next to impossible to complete (well) within the time limit. They're looking to see how you work in a team - making sure everyone is included and working together, demonstrating leadership without taking charge and ignoring the team (as a few of the people in my group tried to do!). Make sure to read the rules thoroughly so you don't get caught out, and participate in the post-exercise discussion even if the other members of your team seem to have mostly answered the questions they ask.

    A technical interview. This is really what you'd expect it to be. A solid understanding of turbofan operation is a must and a good understanding of materials and manufacturing processes will also be useful. Make sure you're aware of what sets the company apart from its competitors. The format was generally they'd show you a drawing or a component and ask questions about it (how it works, what it's made from, how you would make it). They'll throw in some questions that you couldn't really be expected to know the answer to (I was shown a schematic of a prototype oil pump), but don't worry about these. The graduate employees we spoke to stressed that the purpose of these questions (and all of the others too, really) is to see how you react when faced with something new. Be sure to explain your thought process to the assessor even if you can't answer the question. They'll give you hints if you can't answer the question. Sitting there for two minutes without saying anything or just saying "I don't know," without even talking through the problem with them is the only thing you could really do wrong.

    Upon completion, they got back to me within 48 hours and provided detailed feedback on my performance on the day so I can't fault them on their communication.

    Interview Questions

    • What are some environmental factors influencing the design of engines?   1 Answer
    • What recent events in the news might affect Rolls Royce?   1 Answer
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