Bloomberg Industry Group "editors" Reviews | Glassdoor.co.uk

Bloomberg Industry Group Employee Reviews about "editors"

Updated 15 Oct 2019

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3.3
52%
Recommend to a Friend
54%
Approve of CEO
Bloomberg Industry Group CEO Josh Eastright (no image)
Josh Eastright
40 Ratings
Pros
Cons
  • "I honestly think BNA doesn't know what it wants to do because upper management says we need to beat Law360(in 8 reviews)

  • "editors unable to help guide and shape a story(in 8 reviews)

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Reviews about "editors"

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  1. Helpful (3)

    "Zero ethics after Labor Dept story"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Writer in Washington, DC
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at Bloomberg Industry Group full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    Generally speaking, the pay is slightly higher than industry average Expectations aren’t super high with output, so the work/life balance is solid

    Cons

    A lot of people here including myself are seeking other employment. First, Google the Labor Department story if you aren’t familiar. This was a story written in bad faith that wouldn’t have made it into my college paper. The story also put the subject’s career at risk for no reason. Newsrooms put out bad stories sometimes. There’s no excuse. But it happens. This story which contained blatant lies took one month to retract and senior leadership in the newsroom never acted like it was a problem. I never call for termination, but the EIC should be ashamed and resign. This story should’ve been retracted with an apology in less than 5 minutes. The reporter and editors should’ve been terminated on the spot. They have no business being here and most writers here know that. An organization’s values reflect on the writer. Bloomberg Law’s disregard for basic journalism ethics stains my career and I’m embarrassed at events in DC when people bring it up. It also hurts me with sources.

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    Bloomberg Industry Group2019-10-15
  2. Helpful (5)

    "Good Place to Start, Not to Build a Career"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Editor in Arlington, VA
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Bloomberg Industry Group full-time

    Pros

    -A pantry with free snacks, fruit, drinks, and a fancy espresso machine -More diverse than other corporate offices (but not in management, see cons) -Name recognition if you work on the BLAW/BTAX products in the legal industry -Good place to start if you want an alt-law career--but do not plan on staying here for an extended period of time if you don't want your career to basically be over

    Cons

    -No one competent stays here long term. They know that the likelihood of getting promoted at a MARKET SALARY is nearly impossible and leave for better opportunities. This is basically the gateway to fed jobs for some law school grads/lawyers who are transitioning out of private practice. -Upper management has no understanding of the products its editors create and maintain. Therefore, their decisions in what resources to provide and to what groups don't make sense. They will never compete with Westlaw and Lexis for this reason. -Some editorial groups are severely understaffed and management refuses to add positions. Not hiring for certain positions with no clear reason why, so most people are underpaid and working ten times harder while not being allowed to work OT and no support because they aren't hiring anyone. Also a reason why they will never compete with Westlaw or Lexis. -Wish washy when it comes to policies. Some employees are allowed to work remotely full time (from as close as 1-2 hours away or as far as many states away) and others must come into the office each day and aren't allowed to work remotely at all (and not for any good reason like they need to be in the office to do their job). As a legal tech company promoting AI, etc. it's really odd that they would step back from offering flexible work options for employees when the technology is there and there isn't a business reason for it. Some remote employees do a significant less amount of work and clearly are just baggage but unclear why they don't just get rid of those instead of not giving the incentive of flex work to hard working employees. -Promotions are happening more but they are for peanuts. You get "promoted" and the difference in salary bump is laughable. Not competitive. More than nonprofit sector, but not in competition with most other jobs in the area. -If you are young and work hard, you will be making less money than someone who has been there a long time and does nothing and yet, no one has ever written them up or fired them. Not sure if that has to do with managers being afraid of the union (which to be honest is not very strong/has very low membership so don't think that is it) or if maybe they just are too lazy to write up an employee and do not want to bother. -It's common to see a new manager making less money than their employees that are reporting to them which I haven't seen in any other company before. -Upper management has a good amount of women but that is it as far as diversity goes. Just take a look at the exec. page with photos. -There are a lot of very very incompetent/lazy managers. New managers are a lot more enthusiastic/competent. But there still remains managers that they just couldn't fire I guess in the last round of "reorgs" in Oct. but that really should have been. There are managers who barely show up at the office, don't know what their employees are working on, or just flat out don't understand the subject matter their own employees are covering. There are still some non-JD managers managing a legal content group....not sure how that works?

    Bloomberg Industry Group2019-08-07
  3. Helpful (6)

    "Self-serious washouts who sometimes do journalism"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Senior Editor 
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at Bloomberg Industry Group full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    Solid compensation and benefits. There are a lot of newsroom employees for the amount of news that gets produced, so unless you're a reporter you're probably not all that busy. A union shop, which is always welcome. Plenty of good places to eat near the office. Every once in a while, A story that falls within a reporter's beat is interesting enough to get some attention outside of BNA's very specific clientele.

    Cons

    The biggest overall con would be that many of the newsroom employees take their job and their dedication to journalism *very* seriously, but many of them aren't all that good at it: reporters who get beat to stories by other outlets, copy editors who miss typos, and senior editors unable to help guide and shape a story. That's because BNA reports the driest, dullest news imaginable, and no serious journalist in their right mind would want to work there (the ones that do tend to move on, not up). But the jobs pay well, and since many of the reporters and editors have law degrees, doing whatever it is they do there all day is an easier way to pay down those loans than grinding it out as a lawyer. The parent company brought in new leadership under the guise of improving the news product, but mostly all they did was fire people and do everything in their power to weaken the union (things like moving guild editorial staff into made up "management" roles to lower union membership). If the new senior leaders have actually improved the product, it doesn't show. Mostly, it's senior staff pulled over from Bloomberg LP who were happy to take a promotion to do less work. If a reporter finds a story that might be more interesting than normal, those senior editors will flag it and attach themselves to it and (somehow) spend hours or even days "working on" the lede for a story that any other modern news outlet would have had reported, written, edited and published in less than a day. The headline might be a little snappier, though, so they have that going for them. If you were to look at what this newsroom puts out on a weekly basis, you would have a hard time figuring out why so many people work there. Just layer after layer after layer of editorial management for desks that might produce one or two stories per day, on average. Working there doesn't make figuring it out any easier.

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    Bloomberg Industry Group2019-07-31
  4. Helpful (9)

    "Management by Fear, Infighting"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - News in Arlington, VA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Bloomberg Industry Group full-time for more than 10 years

    Pros

    There's a really nice picnic every year that probably costs seven figures to host. All the low-cost, bulk purchase candy and snacks from Sysco you care to enjoy. Although benefits have been undermined with higher health care premiums, co-pays, and elimination of the pension plan, overall benefits are above market. People work hard, but that's because the current CEO has said if you want to get ahead you need to be the first person at your desk in the morning and the last to leave at night. Yes, he really said that.

    Cons

    All the reviews about Bloomberg BNA being the red-headed stepchild of Bloomberg LP are true. This review is through the lens of working in the news room. There are three tribal factions in the news department: BBNA (three brands in Arlington); BGOV (BBNA brand in downtown DC); and Bloomberg News (parent company). All three of them despise and distrust each other and their managers are constantly at war, both openly and sub rosa. While some may act nicely when you speak to them, you will quickly find a dagger in your back within seconds of turning away from what you thought was a friendly conversation -- even with longtime, trusted colleagues. Top management seems to be OK with it, because despite saying there is "one newsroom," plans are drawn up in secret for various re-orgs/power grabs and everyone lives in constant fear of what changes are coming next. Then changes come but are not explained to the employees who are affected, and they are afraid to ask about the reasoning. The resulting culture of fear is exactly how the parent company runs and what they are trying to replicate at BBNA. All senior leadership is from the parent company in New York. Nobody, and I mean nobody, will ever rise through the ranks of BBNA to be a top-level leader. The ones that had climbed the ladder were pushed aside in a massive re-org last year, during which 75 employees were laid off. Another 30 have been laid off so far this year. You can only ascend so far if you are not originally a Bloomberg LP hire. It's a cutthroat atmosphere, and that seems to be what the billionaire owner wants. The few who do rise to 2nd-tier management mostly have climbed on the corpses of their former colleagues to rise to power. The new leadership struggles to understand what the market wants and how to get it to them, so they repeat the cult-like mantras of the parent company even when they don't apply. Rather than focus on in-depth legal and government reporting that is BBNA's strength, reporters and editors are encouraged to chase clickbait stories to get hits for the parent company's Terminal. Time-wasting tangential projects that please the senior leadership for being buzzworthy win internal praise, but metrics show they have no core value whatsoever. Employees hired prior to 2010 had a pension plan, but the weak and myopic union gave it away in collective bargaining. Does a few million dollars in pension costs concern an owner worth $30 billion? Or is it part of a plan to encourage turnover and sweep away old employees? And I use the term "old" in every sense of the word, because age and experience are not valued here. If you're 24 you'll be promised a career plan that will send you around the world and lead to you running the newsroom one day, but if you're of an age that's federally protected by discrimination laws and have not spent your entire career at the parent company they will just squeeze your pay, and try to make you more and more miserable until you get fed up and leave on your own. The disparate treatment exacerbates the divide between early and later career employees discussed in many other reviews here. And, yes, the open floor plan is just as dehumanizing as you think it is.

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    Bloomberg Industry Group2019-07-30
  5. Helpful (3)

    "Great Benefits, Poor Management"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Reporter 
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No Opinion of CEO

    I have been working at Bloomberg Industry Group full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    Great healthcare benefits. Low monthly deductible, low co-pays and minimal prescription costs. It's nice to have the Bloomberg LP platform to promote your stories on (radio, tv). Sources generally take you more seriously since the company is affiliated with BN. Having articles published on the terminal is also great for promoting work and building an audience.

    Cons

    There are numerous reporters and editors who should be let go and aren't, I'm guessing because of the union. Some reporters only produce 4 articles a month while others top 20+, yet reporters aren't paid in terms of their performance, just time spent at the company. Some editors are notorious for being difficult to work with, leading to stories that go out with factual errors and that are so simplified that the story sometimes doesn't make sense. BNA is known for legal analysis, its baffling when you're told not to write plaintiff in a story as that's to jargony. Like seriously? I honestly think BNA doesn't know what it wants to do because upper management says we need to beat Law360. However Law360 type articles I pitch to editors are turned away because they are too jarony and "boring." I don't get it.

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    Bloomberg Industry Group2019-06-27
  6. Helpful (14)

    "Seems to care more about pleasing parent company than getting the news correct"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Legal Editor in Arlington, VA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Bloomberg Industry Group full-time

    Pros

    Almost all pros come from the union, such as benefits and reasonable hours. Managers will ask you to stay late, but will relent if you remind them that you’re entitled to be paid under the contract.

    Cons

    I speak as a former employee and also a subscriber, through my current role. Management is ignoring its customers' needs and blaming its failures on the writers. The company says it wants to be authoritative and analytical, but is instituting policies that lead to shallow and often incorrect articles. Some of the policies: - Hiring team leaders and managing editors who refuse to learn about their legal area and show disdain for the nuances and details that are important for the specialized readership that pay a lot for subscriptions. - Demanding stories be written in very short time frames, leading to articles that miss the point of a case, conflate different legal concepts, and generally shallow writing that isn’t useful. This ultimately hurts the younger journalists who have their names attached to low quality and incorrect articles. - Dumbing down stories- yes it’s good to avoid jargon if you can, but some of these differences really matter to your audience (burden of persuasion vs. burden of production, for example). This leads to imprecision and stories being wrong. - Some managers are refusing requests to correct articles that get legal concepts completely wrong. Management’s stated goal now is that they’re going to beat Law360, but they’re copying a model that Law360 abandoned years ago. Law360 is still dealing with a reputation for being fast but often getting things wrong, and in response has lowered their story count requirements to give their writers more time. BNA used to be known for being accurate and authoritative, but management has abandoned that goal. I know have access to both, and it pains me to say that Law360’s stories are more useful.

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    Bloomberg Industry Group2018-12-15
  7. Helpful (9)

    "reporter"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee 
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at Bloomberg Industry Group full-time for more than 5 years

    Pros

    Used to be able to have a good work/life balance. To some extend, that continues

    Cons

    Pay. Poor editing. Management indecisive, unable to communicate policy across division -- that's because Bloomberg BNA managers are only concerned with impressing higher-ups and, ultimately, Bloomberg LP. Always second-guessing themselves and every they manage. Company recently laid off 50 reporters and editors, as well as 25 managers (rough-but-close numbers); more layoffs expected in 1Q. Little training offered to reporters/editors. Training that is offered is let by long-time in-house managers who lack the skills and credible work experience. Reporters, many of whom have JDs, with experience are treated as cub reporters.

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    Bloomberg Industry Group2018-11-13
  8. "Good freelance pay, difficult work"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Culture & Values
    • Compensation and Benefits
    Correspondent in Omaha, NE
    Neutral Outlook

    I worked at Bloomberg Industry Group for more than 3 years

    Pros

    Telecommuting job, which allows great flexibility. Able to make your own hours. The pay for a freelance journalist is a lot better than most these days--$45 an hour and up.

    Cons

    No feedback from editors or managers, no guidance. This is not for someone who wants to be a feature writer. All stories involve numbers, acronyms, bureaucratic language. It's legal and policy wonk news.

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    Bloomberg Industry Group2016-04-21

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