Deliveroo "minimum wage" Reviews | Glassdoor.co.uk

Deliveroo Employee Reviews about "minimum wage"

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  1. Helpful (7)

    "Awful to work for"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Cycle Delivery Driver in Birmingham, England
    Current Employee - Cycle Delivery Driver in Birmingham, England
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at Deliveroo full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    Getting paid to ride my bike is great, it can be really fun riding around the city, listening to music.

    Cons

    I have been a deliveroo rider for around 6 months now, working full time, 7 days a week most weeks, the only time I don't work 7 days is when I have to recover from being hit by a car or the weather is really bad/dangerous. I have not once earned over the minimum wage at the end of a 2 week pay period. Sure I might get lucky and get 3 or 4 orders in 1 hour, which is £12 an hour but 95% of the time I get 1 order or no orders every hour. Seriously, I work 6-8 hours a day basically every single day and I have absolutely nothing to show for it. I work in Birmingham City Centre and I have to work 50 hour weeks to manage 70 deliveries per week (£280). My pay is so far below the minimum wage I'm basically on £4 - £5 an hour. and even £0 an hour if I'm just sitting around waiting for orders (even during peak hours)

    They offer you incentives to hire more riders but that is completely counter productive to any cyclist struggling to make the minimum wage in Birmingham city centre. The workforce is so over saturated it's ridiculous, it's like every 1 in 20 people you see in town is just another poor deliveroo rider sitting around doing absolutely nothing, just praying he gets those 3 vibrations on his phone telling him he has an order.

    I know they say we're technically self employed but honestly it just feels like a major cop out to get cheap labour. They say you're self employed because you don't have to work if you don't want to and you can choose your hours. That's all well and good but I'd much rather get minimum wage, sick pay, holiday pay and a bit of help if I happen to get hit by a car and break my back whilst on the job and making revenue FOR THEM. It's not too much to ask. It's just a legal loop hole they use to exploit their employees.

    Another thing that really annoys me is that it seems mopeds and motorcycles get a huge priority over cyclists when it comes to getting orders. I was sat outside Wagamamas for about 40 minutes yesterday and I saw at least 5 moped riders come and go from there, even though I was right outside!? It takes me about 7 minutes on average to get anywhere in the city centre so the fact that I'm not getting orders is ridiculous.

    Seriously, this is an absolutely terrible company to work for and I wouldn't recommend it to anyone unless you want to live in poverty. Here's a nice list of cons of working for this company below if you'd like to have a read.

    Pay is WAY below the minimum wage
    You get no insurance
    You get no sick pay
    You get no holiday pay
    Customer/Rider Service are a nightmare to deal with
    They encourage you to work in extremely dangerous weather conditions.
    The job can be dangerous
    You spend most of the time sitting around doing nothing
    A lot of restaurants and customers treat you like dirt
    You have to pay for all of your equipment and maintenance yourself.

    Advice to Management

    Just pay us the minimum wage for god's sake. If a rider is sacrificing their time to be on call for you the least you can do is pay them. We're really not asking for much, we're asking for the BARE MINIMUM. MINIMUM WAGE! If a rider doesn't make minimum wage in an hour you could bump us up a bit to make it worth our while or something like that.


  2. "Don't bother"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Freelancer - Rider in Huddersfield, England
    Current Freelancer - Rider in Huddersfield, England
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at Deliveroo (Less than a year)

    Pros

    No boss.
    Have to enter 5 words haha I don't have 5 good words to say about this job.

    Cons

    Under minimum wage.
    Dangerous.
    Lack of care or support for riders.
    2 week to respond to emails.
    No sick pay.
    No insurance.
    App is glitchy and drops orders then you get charged.
    App glitches and removes your bookings when you hit request weekly.
    Unbelievably crap booking system.
    Not enough shifts for current staff but still employing.
    Priority access to shifts given to riders across the country for working peak hours... absolutely zero shifts if you don't, yet there's not enough peak shifts for the staff they have. When someone get priority they are locked there constantly as they have access to their choice of shifts. This mean no shift for new employees. Ever. Not a new employee but still don't have access.

    Cars trying to force you off the roads constantly .

    Got run over but had no choice but to carry on as no insurance, no compensation and no shifts to earn it back. Resulting in me getting up straightening my wheel and having to carry on in agony.
    Can't afford to repair the bike as I have no shifts.
    Restaurants can take up to 40 mins to give you the order. Not great when the order comes in 1 min before the end of your shift and you are then forced to work an extra hour un paid. Or you can drop the order and get charged for it.
    But at least it's warm. Beats sat in the freezing cold for 4 hours to do 1 order.
    Barely make minimum wage even on the busier days. And risk death for the privelage.

    I had a good job that packed in to do this as I saw it's potential.
    But now I'm having to sell my tv and pspro to make rent and food I realise this job has done nothing but make me worse off.

    Advice to Management

    Go screw yourselves.

  3. Helpful (2)

    "Meh"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Freelancer - Cyclist Courier in Inverness, Scotland
    Current Freelancer - Cyclist Courier in Inverness, Scotland
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at Deliveroo (Less than a year)

    Pros

    Lots of flexibility in work hours which is perfect for people wanting to work part time. Not much else really

    Cons

    The pay is under minimum wage unless you are extremely busy (because you get paid per drop in some areas). There are no workers rights as you are technically self employed.


  4. Helpful (5)

    "Deliveroo Cyclist"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Freelancer - Cycle Delivery Driver in Bristol, England
    Current Freelancer - Cycle Delivery Driver in Bristol, England
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at Deliveroo (Less than a year)

    Pros

    -Good money. I work in Bristol, where you are paid by delivery (£3.75 Mon-Thur, £4.25 Fri-Sun), and you can work whenever you want. You don't even have to book the time or anything, you just switch the app on when you want to start. The payment systems for cyclists are different in different places, but from what I've gathered, Deliveroo is trying to revert more places to this scheme. This system is a pro for me. In 3 months of doing this job I've averaged around £10.50 an hour (including tips, which are about 10% of my earnings), working around 20 hours a week, generally at peak times (evenings, particularly on weekends).

    -You get to cycle as a job. My fitness has improved dramatically as a result. However, if you don't like cycling in all weather the job is probably not for you. As a very rough estimate, I cycle about 1.5 miles for each order.

    -You don't have a boss: You basically never deal with anyone higher up in the hierarchy. I've spoken to rider support (which you have to do if something goes wrong e.g. a milkshake spills or the customer doesn't answer their door) probably fewer than a dozen times, and they're generally quite pleasant. Almost everything is done through the app.

    -Hasn't got boring (yet). After three months, as long as I keep getting orders, I'm never bored while doing the job. There are over a hundred restaurants in Bristol, and I go to new places regularly. I'm still learning about new routes and areas almost every time I go out, and I have to be constantly thinking about the best routes, as you can't really rely on the sat nav while you're riding. They give you a handlebar thing to mount your phone on, but it's laughably useless. I am generally able to memorise the route at the restaurant, but sometimes have to stop and check it.

    -Customers, coworkers and restaurant staff are usually pleasant. At worst, restaurant staff will simply not acknowledge your presence until the food is ready. This is fine by me. I usually bring a kindle to read while I'm waiting, but most people are happy to stand around talking to other riders (you are often waiting with 1-4 deliveroo guys). I think I've dealt with less than half a dozen customers who were even a little bit rude, and when they were, it was because either I or the restaurant had made a mistake with the order.

    -Easy hiring process: I applied during a period where they really needed more cyclists (January). I just filled in a couple of forms online (didn't even need a CV), did a short phone interview, met up with an employee who showed me how the app worked and cycled around for a bit (this was called a "trial", but I think anyone with legs would pass this) and finally went down to their warehouse to pick up the equipment. I had no work experience when I applied, so it doesn't seem like they're very picky with new-hires. However, I've heard from other people who are just as qualified as me that they've been rejected or their applications have been shelved, so I'm guessing the most relevant factor is just the demand at the period during which you're applying. From what I've gathered, they need more people in the winter.

    Cons

    -Earnings are very liable to fluctuation, and there are times when it is difficult to make minimum wage, during which I would simply not bother to log in. I would not recommend this job as a sole source of income, as you get diminishing returns from working more hours - there are only so many peak times. This fluctuation is due as much to deliveroo's hiring practice as it is due to changing demand. There was very little work about a month ago, but things have picked up since they stopped hiring new cyclists around the same time. It's obviously a balance for them between hiring enough people to keep waiting times low and to fulfill every order (sometimes they just say all their cyclists are busy and you can't order) and maintaining reasonable earnings for cyclists. I would say they've done a pretty good job of this during the time that I've been working for them.

    -If you have any questions about the job, it's pretty difficult to get them answered. I've e-mailed them a few times, and I get a useful response less than half of the time.

    -Not everyone will be capable of doing the work. Almost everyone who works as a rider for deliveroo in Bristol is a skinny 20something male, and I suspect this is largely because other demographics would find the work difficult. If you're capable of cycling up the biggest hills in your city, and cycling for 30 minutes at a fairly fast pace, you should be fine.

    -You have to provide your own equipment. You pay a deposit of £150 for the equipment they give you (jacket, t-shirts, jersey, very good charging box, big bag and little bag (one goes inside the other, lights, helmet), which is taken from 50% of the first £300 you earn i.e. no up-front payment. You also need your own bike and phone, and have to pay for maintenance of them.

    -You are self-employed. You are not insured at all (it's a fairly dangerous job), and you don't get any of the benefits (holiday and illness pay etc.) that employees are usually entitled to. You also have to do your own taxes, although I haven't got round to that yet, so I don't know exactly what that entails.

    Advice to Management

    Keep up the good work. There are downsides to the job and the company, but they're mostly necessitated by the unconventional business model. I can't think of any easy fixes for these issues.


  5. "Very frustrating and tough to make money"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Contractor - Cyclist Courier in Dublin, Co. Dublin (Ireland)
    Former Contractor - Cyclist Courier in Dublin, Co. Dublin (Ireland)
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at Deliveroo as a contractor (Less than a year)

    Pros

    Free food for a problem with delivery
    Flexible hours
    Potential to make good money if delivery distances are good and people decide to tip

    Cons

    Very few tips
    Often have to cycle long distances between a drop and collecting food which you don't paid foe
    Have to work quite hard to earn minimum wage if you have long distances to deliveries

    Advice to Management

    Get rid of the delivery charge so people will be more likely to tip


  6. "Deliveroo rider bicycle"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Freelancer - Anonymous Freelancer in Manchester, England
    Current Freelancer - Anonymous Freelancer in Manchester, England
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    Pros

    If you like riding, then why not get paid for it. Excellent rider support if problems with orders. Great bunch of riders to ride with.

    Cons

    Under minimum wage, pay every fortnight but late evening. Don't supply all equipment in that is mentioned in the contract. The contract contradicts it self. They take a deposit out your wage with out asking. It is mentioned about the 150.00 deposit in contract, but not how they will take it or any breakdown. They just take it out your wage and wont give a break down what for even if you don't receive the full equipment.

    Advice to Management

    Re write your contract, be honest with employees. Give them options, improve you connection with riders.Answer your emails quicker.


  7. Helpful (6)

    "Leave a.s.a.p. - Bad Company"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Current Freelancer - Anonymous Freelancer
    Current Freelancer - Anonymous Freelancer

    Pros

    After 6 month riding my scooter for them, there are NO pros.

    Cons

    Wagecut from £7 to £6 p/h by March, £1 per drop to level the minimum wage they say. Neurotic female area manager who make remotely strange decisions from her phone or laptop. Scary tactics to enforce shifts. No Support after i crashed. Depressing. Just get me a new job.

    Deliveroo Response

    23 Jun 2016 – Talent Associate

    Hi,

    Our riders’ happiness is very important to us, and we appreciate your feedback about your experience.

    We offer the opportunity for a fun, flexible way to gain additional income on a... More