Lyft "minimum wage" Reviews | Glassdoor.co.uk

Lyft Employee Reviews about "minimum wage"

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  1. "Wouldn't recommend as a gig"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Freelancer - Driver in Portland, OR (US)
    Former Freelancer - Driver in Portland, OR (US)
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Lyft (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    You are your own boss.

    Cons

    You really don't make much money. Sometimes less than minimum wage if you consider expenses and time.

    Advice to Management

    Pay people more


  2. "Bad company"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Freelancer - Driver in Washington, DC (US)
    Current Freelancer - Driver in Washington, DC (US)
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at Lyft (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    Deal with different categories of costumers

    Cons

    This company abuses its contractors, you can drive all day long and barely make minimum wage. That's not even accounting for the car depreciation and the cost of gas.

  3. Helpful (4)

    "Lyft Driver (read this one)"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Freelancer - Data Scientist in Chicago, IL (US)
    Current Freelancer - Data Scientist in Chicago, IL (US)
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at Lyft (More than 5 years)

    Pros

    You can kind of pick your own hours, but not really because surge pricing is only at 7am and 2am. Either sleep during the day or work for pennies.

    Cons

    -Pay is extremely low. I've made more as a 16 year old working at IHOP.

    -Lyft will deactivate you if you decline to drive someone with a service animal. This includes if you are allergic from them.. This is unlawful and unethical and lyft is basically assuming the driver is a worthless human. If the driver is allergic to dogs, why is lyft forcing the driver to give the passenger with a dog a ride because it's a service animal? The driver can end up in the hospital. Horrible lyft policy (and I'm pretty sure the lyft policy negates the actual federal law somewhere).

    -Cannot see where the passenger is headed. I'm often giving rides to horrible neighborhoods. This is extremely unsafe for the driver. The driver should not be forced to drive in a specific area that he knows is dangerous, especially for a $3.56 trip.

    -Lyft never surges AT ALL. It is snowing right now, Friday night at 5pm and rush hour. No surge (prime time as they call it). I gave a 2 hour ride for $25, and no tip in rush hour. Too many drivers no matter what area I'm in.

    -Lyft does not adjust their prices according to the price of gas. You'd think for how many data scientists, programmers, mathematicians, statisticians, product managers, billions of dollars, etc... lyft and uber would have the common sense to increase prices using some linear or non-linear relationship to the price of gas. Gas fluctuates so much, so does demand, but the prices stay the same and the driver barely makes anything above minimum wage. If gas prices were higher back when gas was trading at $90/barrel I'm pretty sure I'd be losing money every ride (if not losing money pretty damn close!)

    -Lyft calculates their pay to try and trick the drivers that aren't as "quantitative." What I mean by this is lyft pays the driver by minute, then by mile, and with some lyft platform fee that is "subject to change at any time." Hahaha...Okay I know how this works. Long story short the platform fee changes based on how long your ride is, whether it's a shared ride, how many miles, blah blah blah and it's a simply math formula that calculates the lyft platform fee (which sometimes loses money) to keep the drivers hourly rate in tact. It's a way to make sure not to pay the drivers too much per hour (or per trip, however you want to think about it). My suggestion would be to take away the tricks and just pay the driver a percentage of the fair (80% like it states you should online). This platform fee makes lyft take 50% + from many rides. I was paid $2.15 for a ride when the passenger paid $7.19! I drove the passenger 5 blocks and arrived in about 2 minutes. This platform fee took the majority of the pay (like i said it is increased when you give short rides and decreased when you give long rides, but also decreases on shared rides with only one passenger. It's a strange calculation). FIX THIS.

    -The worst part is yes sometimes this is an easy job and I meet cool people, but often times it's not. The least of my worries is driving to the airport and having some snobby passenger complain about me not picking up their bags when they don't tip. The worst part about lyft is surprisingly not the low pay, but it's my safety. It's one thing to consider who's getting in the car, but I should really have the right to know where they're going. As hard as I try, I have ended up countless times in some of the worst neighborhoods in Chicago. My approach is to click "arrive" a few blocks early so I can see where they're going, and then cancel the ride if they're going to a bad neighborhood. However this is stupid because passengers just get frustrated and lyft should just allow the driver to accept of decline the ride, rather than having every ride that goes in a bad area be declined.

    Advice to Management

    I really hope lyft reads this.

    Lyft has tons of resources, money, and talented employees. I am a data scientist / quantitative researcher and was rejected from lyfts HR department countless times for their data scientist role (which I am more than qualified for). The fact that they put HR in charge of who gets an interview for this type of role is pathetic and outdated (the hiring manager should look at the resumes, not HR - HR doesn't know what LSTM is). I started driving for lyft because I needed money (but I quickly realized that was not the right option). Anyway, Lyft has the freedom to choose how to operate their business and make a $10B company with bad reviews into a $100B company with great reviews. It seems lyft is choosing the former. Some super simple suggestions to make the company owners successful, VC's happy, drivers happy, and passengers happy (leading to an overall positive sentiment of the company) would be some simple changes in how the app operates, as well as how the pay is calculated.

    My suggestions:
    -Show the drivers where they're going (really, this is the easiest and will make both the drivers and passengers happy. Trust me on this, it is much better for hundreds of reasons, rather than your one reason about discrimination)

    -Really, pay the drivers higher. That extra $2 you're taking from every ride really hits the drivers. What are you going to do with all that money? Give it back to the homeless? Why do that when your employees aren't far from homeless? I'm actually serious about that. Drivers should be paid a percentage of the fair. Eliminate the lyft platform fee, mile rate, and minute rate...just keep it simple. Keep all those milage/ minute fees internal.

    Allow a driver to not accept a ride if he/she is allergic to animal, even if it's a service animal.

    It's funny because you think this review is probably just some random driver leaving an angry review, but it's not. I'm giving advice to show you how to grow a company and actually be the good guys and leave uber as the bad guys. Trust me on my suggestions, you'll be a richer company and you'll seek top talent like facebook, google, amazon, apple, microsoft, goldman sachs... etc.. Right now you're just a start up. If you follow my advice you might just see the growth to be on the same level as google and facebook.


  4. Helpful (1)

    "Lyft Driver"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Current Freelancer - Anonymous Freelancer
    Current Freelancer - Anonymous Freelancer

    Pros

    On demand, work whenever you want

    Cons

    Does not tell you how long the projected drive is before an offer is made
    Frequently earn less than minimum wage for rides


  5. "Not bad part time, difficult full time."

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Former Freelancer - Anonymous Freelancer
    Former Freelancer - Anonymous Freelancer

    Pros

    As a side job Lyft offers a good way to make some extra cash.

    Cons

    Doing Lyft full time when taking car maintenance into account you may end up working for less than minimum wage.

    Advice to Management

    Work out some better partnerships for car maintenance.


  6. Helpful (4)

    "Great Company to work for"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Community Associate
    Current Employee - Community Associate
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Lyft full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    Company culture focus on diversity and inclusion. Employee benefits start on day 1. Management is engaged with staff and supportive. Focus on retaining great drivers. Great perks make commuting and life a little easier. Opportunities for advancement, even in non-tech roles.

    Cons

    Starting pay is much higher than minimum wage but still isn't in step with Bay Area cost of living.


  7. Helpful (7)

    "You are not your own boss"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Freelancer - Driver in Phoenix, AZ (US)
    Current Freelancer - Driver in Phoenix, AZ (US)
    Doesn't Recommend

    I have been working at Lyft (Less than a year)

    Pros

    Ability to make a few bucks. If you're willing to be treated like a second class citizen by Lyft and customers the whole time.

    Cons

    Can be sub-minimum wage.

    You are not your own boss. Lyft hides important decision making factors from the drivers : historical request patterns, ability to set fares, you have no idea of your customer's destination before accepting a request. You are dinged if you don't accept it.

    Passengers give a rating with no understanding what the system is. Drivers get deactivated for ratings that can be considered good.

    Any complaint or low rating by a rider is accepted by Lyft at face value even though too many passengers seek free rides this way. Drivers get no real opportunity to rebut, except at Lyft's leisure. They may take days or months to reply to anything, if at all. If you are wrongfully deactivated based on a lie by a passenger looking for a free ride, you will find quickly they don't care about you or being fair in any form.

    Drivers put in the work, the expense and shoulder financial risk for little to no reward.

    Realize that the goal in rideshare is driverless cars, so they are not investing in their drivers.

    Advice to Management

    Treat drivers with a little bit of respect.

  8. Helpful (2)

    "Driving for Lyft"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Freelancer - Driver in San Francisco, CA (US)
    Current Freelancer - Driver in San Francisco, CA (US)
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at Lyft (Less than a year)

    Pros

    I drive for Lyft because of its flexibility. I can sign on and off when I need to. The Lyft community is generally a great group of people.

    Cons

    The cons for driving for Lyft is that the wear and tear that is happening to your car are not being covered by the company and in the end, you make less than the federal minimum wage.

    Advice to Management

    My advice to management would for it to treat its independent contractors like they would treat their employees. The driving fleet is the legs of the operation.


  9. Helpful (12)

    "Drivers getting the shaft, low pay"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Freelancer - Lyft Driver in Boulder, CO (US)
    Current Freelancer - Lyft Driver in Boulder, CO (US)
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at Lyft (More than a year)

    Pros

    Most passengers are nice, and I meet some very interesting people. Passengers don't throw up in my car very often. Lyft is getting better with regard to drivers being able to contact them for help. I set my own schedule. I'm able to rent a car through Lyft/Hertz, because I don't own a car.

    Cons

    I can't really set my own hours, because I have to work very early in the morning and very late at night to get enough rides to earn any money. Not many rides are requested in the middle of the afternoon. Many passengers don't tip, and often I earn below minimum wage. The pay to drivers is way too low. Lyft takes a cut off the top, and then splits what is left with the driver. Lyft used to take 20 percent of what's left. Now they take more - 25 percent. The bonus Lyft pays toward the cost of the rental car has decreased several times. The minimum number of rides a driver must complete to get the rental cost bonus has gone up and up - to the point where it is almost unattainable. The cost of the rental car keeps going up - now $230 per week. Sometimes the app malfunctions, causing me to miss rides. Lyft aggressively recruits drivers to the point a Lyft driver is on every corner. So much driver competition means sometimes I get one ride per hour, and the average pay per ride is $4. If I drove around trying to get a ride instead of parking, I might have spent $3 on gas. If I park too long, Lyft kicks me off the app, and I have to move my car to log in again. The people who are happy working for Lyft are those who work in corporate offices. They probably get paid well. I work about 30-45 hours per week, and I take home about $500-800 per month. That's after paying about $720 per month for the rental car (after bonuses are credited). And that's before I pay taxes on my money earned. That's not a living wage. Lyft tells passengers the driver gets all the tip money when the passenger tips through the app. That's true - Lyft doesn't take any of it, but the driver has to pay taxes on it. Cash tips, though rare, are better. Sometimes I get home after a 9 hour shift of driving on busy freeways, and in downtown traffic, turning left and right, watching traffic lights, watching my GPS, avoiding pedestrians, concerning myself with my passenger's music and indoor temperature, holding a conversation, making sure my passengers aren't late for work, or don't miss their flights, and get home from the party safely, and I clean my car of the donut sprinkles they ate in my back seat and the dog hair they had on their shoes and the snot they wiped on the door handle, and I lay down and feel as if I'm still moving, and I feel very used, under appreciated, and underpaid. Five stars doesn't support me and my daughter.

    Advice to Management

    Pay your drivers more. Quit double-dipping in drivers pay by taking a cut off the top, and then taking 25 percent before paying drivers. Do one or the other, not both. Pay drivers 80 percent commission, instead of 75 percent - you can afford it. Stop recruiting so many drivers. Not enough passengers exist for the number of drivers you have. My deductible on auto insurance for your rental car is $2,500. Find better insurance for your drivers. Educate passengers about how little drivers earn, and why passengers need to tip a driver who has provided good service. Even fifty cents is better than nothing. Some passengers can't afford to tip, I understand.... but almost every passenger can afford fifty cents or twenty five cents. Even that would add up. If Lyft would pay drivers more, tips wouldn't be such a big deal, and drivers could rest assured they would earn a decent living that week. More advice to management... reduce the cost of rental cars. When the new year comes, and the car is one year older - reduce the rental fee. Give drivers the choice of a new car at a higher rate, or a 4 year old car at a lower rate. Lower the minimum number of rides required to receive a rental bonus. Show drivers where the passenger is going before the driver accepts the ride. If I have to pick up my daughter in an hour and a half, I can't take a 2+ hour ride to the airport. So you say, "then don't drive, log out." I can't log out two hours before I need to get off work every day. I wouldn't earn any money that way. Also, quit cancelling rides when you think a driver isn't moving toward their passenger. Sometimes a driver is headed in the wrong direction when the ride is requested, or they are in the left turn lane when the new ride request requires a right turn. The driver needs to find a safe place to turn around. Same goes for passengers cancelling rides. Sometimes your driver needs to turn around. Sometimes a u-turn is unsafe or illegal. Sometimes a railroad track is between the driver and the passenger, and the driver needs to go to where a road crosses the track. Passengers (and the app) need to have some patience. Lyft needs to educate passengers about this. Drivers know they are being used and abused until the day self-driving cars are on the road, and drivers will be cast aside. That's a crappy feeling - that we have helped to build a mega company and will be disposed of. That's a crappy reputation you are building. You claim to be lifting people up by allowing them the opportunity to be a driver on your platform, but you are not. If you really wanted to Lyft them up, you could bonus them shares of stock or vesting in company ownership. That would change the whole game. Right now - the way it is - drivers are getting the shaft, and corporate people are becoming uber rich. Lyft's business model is terrible for the drivers. Just like most other large corporations, you are stepping on the little guys to get where you are going. Look at Chobani Yogurt's business model. The workers got a stake in the company. The company actually cares about the workers who made them what they are. The workers actually care about the company. It's a win-win. Lyft should take note, and appreciate the people who helped them reach and exceed their goals.


  10. Helpful (8)

    "Essentially unprotected below minimum wage work"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Berkeley, CA (US)
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Berkeley, CA (US)
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Lyft full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    I guess the customers that told me I was worth more than this job

    Cons

    Well.....They'll manipulate words and time clocks to try to hide the fact that the pay has been halved in the last year. They'll also allow customers to verbally abuse and racially degrade you (the number of times I heard how bad "white people " are and how bad "americans" are, as I drive them to and fro for a pittance, is far beyond what you might expect). If you set any boundary with a customer or present any facts, i.e. "my father is an 'old white man' and he's done a lot of good in the world', they can retaliate through the ratings system and threaten your job.
          These jobs are sold as "hey get a little extra money, kid!", but the reality is you have to drive A LOT to make much beyond your expenses. That means, it really is a full time or near full time job, with zero benefits, zero accountability by management, zero customer accountability and all of the liability shifted to the minimum wage or below minimum wage worker.
          Lyft tries to present itself as an advocate for social awareness and 'diversity', but they are only in the game of rapacious 'screw the worker' capitalism. Not judging, just making it clear.
         ALSO please note: the majority of positive reviews are at the engineer level, or are false reviews placed by HR. Most drivers rate this work as degrading at best.
        Realistically, Taxi's were a way better deal for drivers and would be better for everyone if they could just catch up with a better hailing system, i.e. Flywheel.

    Advice to Management

    I know that you are just screwing everyone until you have self driving cars. Luckily I have a career lined up that is ACTUALLY rewarding and ACTUALLY socially conscious.
    Keep up the good work with your sociopathically Orwellian PR!