Palgrave Macmillan Reviews | Glassdoor.co.uk

Palgrave Macmillan Reviews

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  1. Helpful (2)

    "Could be a great place to work, but management politics causes unnecessary stress and uncertainty!"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Editorial Assistant in London, England
    Current Employee - Editorial Assistant in London, England
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook

    I have been working at Palgrave Macmillan full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    The work is genuinely interesting, and we produce some beautiful books. Everyone who deals directly with the hands-on and creative elements of the publishing industry (so everyone from sales and marketing to production and editorial and design) is really passionate about good content and happy customers and authors. The atmosphere in individual departments is positive, and things like regular pub trips and extracurriculars like the choir mean that people make friends within the company quickly and easily. The offices are in an ideal location, really easy to get to for anyone living in London or the surrounding area.

    Cons

    Morale is lower than it should be. One key reason for this is that there is no real sense among the average employee that senior management care enough about us or our books to support us properly. In the months I've been here, staff turnover has been very high for various reasons, including moving on elsewhere, some redundancies, and several junior employees just becoming burnt out and sick of the stress. Compounding the problem is the fact that people who leave are not always replaced (and when they are this is never done in a timely manner), meaning that the colleagues left behind end up taking on loads of extra work for no extra pay or recognition. The company says the framework for salary and promotion is going to be made more transparent in future, but at the moment it is murky and deceptive, with no ongoing review of performance and seemingly random spates of mass job-title-changes every few months. If they could spend less time messing about with the company structure/brand/website/systems, and more time making sure their current employees are healthy and happy, that would make such a difference.

    Advice to Management

    Support the development of junior employees by encouraging them to take ownership of meaningful projects, not just stretching them as thinly as possible and overloading them with frustrating admin jobs.


  2. "Editorial Assitant/Assistant Editor"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook

    I worked at Palgrave Macmillan full-time

    Pros

    Good stepping stone to move to other publishing companies/roles.

    Cons

    Poor management, tedious administrative work, creatively un-stimulating and lots of red tape to get anything approved.

    Advice to Management

    Stop outsourcing departments to save money - quality has gone massively downhill as has the morale of staff. Invest more in staff on the ground and make wages transparent and equal across the same role.

  3. "Corporate Chaos"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Editorial Assistant in London, England
    Current Employee - Editorial Assistant in London, England
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook

    I have been working at Palgrave Macmillan full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    Some lovely intelligent and engaged people work here! Palgrave as have a strong brand and friendly work culture. The (editorial) work is always varied, and gives good opportunities to learn and grow - if you're a naturally autonomous worker who can cope well under pressure.

    Cons

    The merger with Springer has destroyed the Palgrave company culture, as you feel like nothing more than a cog in a machine. Senior management shows little to no notice of the on the ground work/grafting done by junior and mid-level staff. You're bogged down by operational and administrative work, which hampers any creative growth. I've felt bullied by a line manager, who has used punitive performance plans in an attempt to 'whip staff into shape'. You feel pressured to lie to external figures like authors and editors to cover up mass chaos and disorganisation within the company. There is no Union activity at SpringerNature. Low morale. OVERWORKED and UNDERPAID. Lots of talented and nice people put to waste. You're told to stick to the party line. High turnover of staff. Lack of transparency about pay, and you're kept in the dark about high level strategy -
     even things like basic publishing strategy. Reputation of the Palgrave is being damaged. Staff made redundant overnight to cut costs. Company pushes for quantity over quality. Your voice isn't heard. Company only cares about overheads. Instability!

    Lack of diversity or commitment to equal pay or equality in general - female staff make up majority of the workforce, but most senior roles are occupied by middle aged white men with outrageous pay checks.

    Physical and mental burn out is a common occurrence, with many across the company - there is a flimsy attempt to offer internal counselling services, which many prefer not to take.

    You feel unimportant and easily replaceable.

    Advice to Management

    Management also suffers under poor company wide organisation. Line managers need to speak up on behalf of their reports, stay in communication, and focus on teamwork. Management needs to be authentic, and not mask the truth of matters with prescribed lines from higher-ups. Management need to push for fairer pay for their reports. Management needs to support the staff under them with care and consideration, not unprofessional aggression or attitude. Management needs to understand why moral is so low and take action! Management needs to help workers understand their rights.


  4. Helpful (5)

    "Avoid!"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Editorial Assistant in King's Cross, England
    Current Employee - Editorial Assistant in King's Cross, England
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook

    I have been working at Palgrave Macmillan full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    The high volume work load ensures that Editorial Assistants get a varied amount of tasks and acquire useful admin, marketing, email and time management skills. I enjoyed working with authors on the lists I managed, even those who were particularly challenging. It was rewarding to work with them and produce a product they were happy with and that fits into the publishing programme.

    Cons

    I do not think the negative atmosphere in my team is enjoyable or condusive to output. I was bullied and lied to by my manager. I did not receive positive feedback from any senior editor in the team but was ignored unless I did not do a task immediately when they asked. When Editorial Assistants offer valuable suggestions in team meetings, the credit goes to their managers, who use it to further their own career. There is no motivation or reward for being innovative and proactive.

    Advice to Management

    Train managers and give them important lessons in enabling happy staff members. Every EA in Palgrave works very hard and is dedicated to producing world-class books. However, the atmosphere of extreme hierarchy and the huge pressure on EAs to do tasks at the drop of a hat for a manager, and to receive no positive feedback at all, is depressing. It would make a huge difference if managers would praise their staff for the high volume of work they regularly achieve, which in effect enables managers to reach their target. Instead, senior staff don't even acknowledge the work done. Salary should be revised because the pay level for EAs is below London living wage and is quite frankly appalling, considering we were all told that Palgrave made an astounding profit last year.


  5. Helpful (4)

    "Awful place to work!"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in London, England
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in London, England
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook

    I worked at Palgrave Macmillan full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    I worked with a few great people. Lots of colleagues very passionate about publishing.

    Cons

    Awful management (the worst I've ever experienced: bullying, dishonest and unprincipled), no tangible benefits, unrealistic expectations, low morale, high staff turnover, ill informed business practices, overall terrible decision making by management.


  6. Helpful (4)

    "Mixed Feelings"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Design in London, England
    Former Employee - Design in London, England
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook

    I worked at Palgrave Macmillan full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    I really liked my colleagues, and made some very good friends
    Campus is nice
    Immediate management (i.e. line managers) are caring and doing the best they can in the circumstances

    Cons

    The company ethos is worrying – values quanitity over quality

    Higher management seem happy to implement drastic changes, with little or no adequate training, and no testing stages. Recent example: IT department were made redundant, an outsourced 'call centre' style IT helpdesk implemented, this resulted in hundreds of employees waiting days for things like new password resets, printers didn't work, new employees couldn't log in for weeks. No initial user testing – it was utter chaos.

    Management actively discourage discussions of pay between employees, even though the Equality Act 2010 provides that an employer cannot prevent their employees from making a ‘relevant pay disclosure’ to anyone, and cannot prevent employees from seeking such a disclosure from a colleague, including a former colleague.

    Pay in my department was very low for industry standard (I gathered data from other publishers and salaries posted on Glassdoor to reach that conclusion) and management usually refused to engage in any realistic discussion about your earning potential, or even why you're being paid the amount you are.

    Advice to Management

    Do not discourage pay discussion if you want to have good moral amongst staff,I also believe it to be illegal under the Equality act 2010.

    Staff turnover seems to be very frequent. It shouldn't be considering most people start off caring a lot about the industry they're in, the people they work with and the work they're doing. It's sad to see how demoralised many people are. Better consideration of the jobs staff are doing, and respect for their expertise would help.


  7. "Mixed Feelings"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in London, England
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in London, England
    Recommends
    Negative Outlook

    I have been working at Palgrave Macmillan full-time

    Pros

    Great colleagues and team
    Interesting content to work on/with

    Cons

    Low salary
    Poor development opportunites

    Advice to Management

    Revise pay. Publishing is low-paid but unfortunately I believe many employees here are paid below industry standard at PM and salaries on the whole are not London weighted.

  8. Helpful (1)

    "Good company to develop at"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Assistant Editor in London, England
    Current Employee - Assistant Editor in London, England
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook

    Pros

    Freedom to explore different products and work with different teams, great co-workers, chance to work at all levels of publishing and to learn more about the industry. great location.

    Cons

    Poor technical support means you are often unable to do your job, confused and constantly changing targets and objectives from upper management, corporate structure changes too often, understaffed in key areas.


  9. "Boring, pretty basic job"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Assistant in New York, NY (US)
    Former Employee - Assistant in New York, NY (US)
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook

    I worked at Palgrave Macmillan full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    Nice location and offices, good health benefits

    Cons

    Not a great salary, not enough diversity


  10. "A lovely imprint destroyed by corporate greed"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in New York, NY (US)
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in New York, NY (US)
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook

    I have been working at Palgrave Macmillan full-time (More than 5 years)

    Pros

    -some colleagues are good
    -pay is decent

    Cons

    I started working here pre-Springer, and I loved my job. Now we are under Springer and it is terrible to come to work every day. Springer doesn’t care about authors, the books, quality, or anything except quantity and money. They cut cost wherever they can at the expense of the books. It’s been truly sad to watch Palgrave Macmillan be destroyed by another imprint. Don’t work here unless you’re looking for just a pay check where you can work your 9-5 and go. This company punishes people who care because you will always be disappointed.

    Advice to Management

    Maybe care a little more about your reputation and your products than about factory producing thousands of books. Our authors hate us, and management doesn’t have to deal with authors so they don’t care.