Spotify "stockholm" Reviews | Glassdoor.co.uk

Spotify Employee Reviews about "stockholm"

Updated 24 Jan 2020

To filter reviews, or .
4.3
81%
Recommend to a Friend
98%
Approve of CEO
Spotify CEO  and  Co-Founder Daniel Ek
Daniel Ek
29 Ratings
Pros
Cons
  • "growing pains and learning how to be efficient(in 20 reviews)

  • "Only disadvantage was that it's hard for partners to find work in Stockholm(in 17 reviews)

More Pros and Cons

Reviews about "stockholm"

Return to all Reviews
  1. "Best company to work for!!"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Executive Assistant in London, England
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Spotify full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    I have been at the company for two years. Never have I worked somewhere where there is such a focus on staff well being and staff engagement. The office environment is second to none - We moved in last year and it’s absolutely wonderful. It’s been designed with staff in mind so there are loads amazing areas to work from, you have the Hideaway which is for quiet working with cool sofas and a smoothie bar, Fitness Studio, collaborative squad areas for teams, the ‘pitstop’ for grab and go items with fridges stocked to the brim with free food and drinks and we are all eagerly awaiting new new ground floor to open which will include a stage area, cafeteria for free hot meals, coffee shop, games rooms etc. Spotify is unique in that it is headquartered out of Stockholm. New York and London are its 2nd and 3rd biggest hubs. You get to travel pretty frequently if you so wish which one of my favourite things about the company - It’s truly global. All meeting rooms are decked out with Google Hangouts too so it’s super easy to have video calls with anyone no matter their location . All staff get new Apple Macs upon joining and the choice of an Android or iPhone - We are very lucky to be given the very latest in technology whereas lots of my previous companies would give staff pretty old stuff to work with. The benefits are insane such as stock options upon joining, Bupa Dental, Bupa Healthcare, 6 months full pay maternity and paternity benefit with a 7th month gradual back to work, 12% pension (4% you 8% Spotify), 6 free counselling sessions a year, flu vaccinations, weekly massages, agile working so you can work from home pretty frequently thanks to Google Hangouts, crazy amount of free food and snacks daily and great Summer and Holiday parties too. Everyone is super friendly which make it an incredibly enjoyable environment to work in.

    Cons

    We hire 120 every month globally so there needs to be a focus on ensuring that the culture remains there. That’s like the size of a company every month.

    Continue reading
    Spotify2019-11-08
  2. "Awesome place to work"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Stockholm, Stockholm
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at Spotify full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    I had a wonderful time at Spotify. Great colleagues, interesting projects, meaningful growth opportunities, incredible product... a lot to be proud of.

    Cons

    Only disadvantage was that it's hard for partners to find work in Stockholm

    Spotify2020-01-24
  3. "Work on a product you love"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Senior Data Scientist in Stockholm, Stockholm
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Spotify full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    Spotify hires top talent and has great growth prospects. The CEO is clearly the smartest person at the company.

    Cons

    Pay is competitive in Stockholm but in NYC it is not when compared with Google, Facebook, or Netflix.

    Spotify2019-11-15
  4. Helpful (16)

    "Lack of motivation and unfulfilling work"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Software Engineer in New York, NY
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at Spotify full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    Great work-life balance. You get to travel a lot (hit or miss if you're into that.. personally for me Stockholm gets old) Pay is mid-tier. Still great if you're comfortable knowing most SWE's at other tech companies make more than you. Great insurance, vacation policy, and parental leave.

    Cons

    With great wlb and autonomy comes some seriously unmotivated employees who take forever to get anything done. Maybe it's because the hiring bar has seriously lowered or maybe it's because there's no bonus structure combined with the fact that Spotify will probably not fire you as long as you push some code and are a fun/nice person. Regardless, at some point, you're going to realize you spend 40 hours a week at work and would like to spend most of it NOT trying to motivate underperforming teammates to actually code and NOT deal with process heavy and debilitating consensus-driven product decisions that get trashed in 6 months because you're re-orged to some other part of the company. Spotify is honestly great if you're a parent or just want to coast because they expect so little from you. That said, if you're ambitious and find satisfaction from actually building great products with hardworking and innovative teammates I'd refrain from coming here.

    Continue reading
    Spotify2019-08-27
  5. "best job I had so far"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Android Engineer in Stockholm, Stockholm
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Spotify full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    - working with really smart people - working in cross functional team, having end-to-end responsibility of a product - free food all day - lots of afterworks, separate floor for having fun (pingpong, foosball, VR room, kareoke room, board game room and more) - free Spotify account - people from all around the world, really open and really friendly - chance to go to conferences and visiting other offices in other countries (or even relocate there fully supported) - changing teams time to time is encouraged - good quality product - great development environment provided, good IT department - flexible working hours

    Cons

    - making swede friends is not easy, but they mostly speak english even in between each other - getting a promotion is not easy, the whole system is a bit weird for me. The people who decide if you are worthy are people you are not working with. In order to move forward you need to increase your visibility, which means that everyone gets a lot of company-wide emails from people trying to do exactly that about topics that are not important. - The salary is not great compared to other companies in Stockholm, but including the other perks (like stock options) it's still a pretty neat package

    Continue reading
    Spotify2019-08-12
  6. Helpful (2)

    "Good platform to launch career"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Marketing Director in New York, NY
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No Opinion of CEO

    I have been working at Spotify full-time for less than a year

    Pros

    Great brand, flexible lifetsyle, beloved product.

    Cons

    Hard to get ahead out of Stockholm office, little opportunity for advancement in career within the company.

    Spotify2019-05-21
  7. Helpful (23)

    "Sounds sexier than it is"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Senior Engineer in Stockholm, Stockholm
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    No Opinion of CEO

    I worked at Spotify full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    Spotify has a solid engineering culture. With roughly 1,000 engineers around the globe (though mostly in Stockholm and NYC) there is a lot of internal tooling, which is sometimes hard to debug: the documentation is not always great and there is no help outside of the company. However, the overwhelming majority of the engineers are extremely helpful and spend their time generously helping you debug issues with the internal infrastructure, although the situation has improved as the tooling has matured. There are several standardized guides for different disciplines: mobile development, back-end engineering, data engineering, data science, and a few others. These are especially good for newcomers as these allow you to get up and running within a few hours. Hack days (2 per month) and an R&D-wide hack week (5 day per annum) are great. These days allow you work on whatever project you wish, so it's great for learning new programming languages, reading up on research, trying out a new framework, or even work on crazy ideas. Annual hack weeks are a major event where all of R&D spends a whole week working on non-work things. There are daily breakfasts, fikas (Swedish cake time), and various events in the office, including a party on Friday to conclude and celebrate hack week. Conference week is another annual event, where different "chapters" (disciplines) hold their internal (un-)conferences. This means most of R&D flies across the globe for a week of showing off what's new in the infrastructure and what tools are available or being developed. There are also annual off-sites, where an entire "tribe" (department) comes together at a non-office location. Most of these off-sites tend to be about socializing as there are often about 100 people or so. Most employees seem to enjoy networking with beers at a fancy location, while a few see it for what it is: a colossal waste of time, especially personal time: you have to travel several hours back and forth to spend 24 hours a day with your peers for no other reason than to listen to a few strategy talks, unconference sessions (i.e. discussions that do not need to have any clear outcomes), and eating/drinking. After about two days, the event is over. If you like trips, these are all great. If you prefer to stick to business and keep travel to a minimum because of other commitments or interests, not so much. It's great that every employee can choose the laptop they want and you get a fancy desk that can be moved up and down for standing up or sitting down. Any gear you need to be productive or comfortable is usually a simple request from your boss and a click away. It's a no-fuss attitude to whatever people need for their work. Please note that the office areas are not exactly quiet or private, especially in the larger offices. The idea is that an open office plan fosters collaboration, but it's really because it's cheaper and the company is growing like mad. Intro days are a three-day event where hundreds of newcomers flock to Stockholm to listen to talks from the CXOs and VPs about the company. It is a great way to introduce people to the company. The same goes for town halls, where the entire company is invited to listen on the latest updates from the executives. Most offices are fairly easy when it comes to working from home. In most cases you inform your team about it and that's it. As long as the work gets done and you don't work from home every day of the week, it's all right. You're free to come and go as you please as you don't have to clock in/out. In many offices there is sometimes music playing in all areas, not just the reception or central bits. While this is great in theory, it's not always conducive to quality work, especially when people play "Pink Fluffy Unicorns Dancing on Rainbows" or a sequence of 8-bit versions of 80s power ballads. Headphones are definitely a must on those days. Again, when you join you get a pair of headphones, so you're at least covered there.

    Cons

    If you are not in the main offices (Stockholm or New York) many benefits are not available to you or only after extensive begging. It took several years for Swedish to be offered to foreign employees in the Gothenburg office and even then it was only through a conference call, not on site. Many discounts or special deals (e.g. with banks) are also only available in shops around the major offices, which means employees in the other offices are often left out. The time between the official announcement of a promotion and the time when it's registered in the HR system can take up to four months, during which of course the question of a potential salary bump is neatly avoided. I have yet to receive a good explanation why it takes so long or why the company is loath to discuss salary increases for people it deems worthy of promotions. The stock options are laughable. Permanent employees do not get many when they join and stock options are granted for exceptional performance, not RSUs, which means you first have to pay for the privilege of getting at the shares. In Sweden you can even pay taxes of up to 90% (e.g. cashless exercise or same-day sale), which means the options are mostly a gift for the government. There is somewhat of a frat house culture, which is considered "playful", one of the company's values. This translates into pinball machines, nerf guns, hoverboards, free snacks and drinks, many office parties, ping-pong and billiards tables, Fridays where people walk around in bunny/unicorn/squirrel costumes and drink beer or wine in the afternoon, board games coming out of your ears, Mario Kart competitions, and the likes. The relaxed environment is definitely nice and a big plus. The "playfulness" is for some people a major bonus, while for others it feels silly or yet another way to keep people in the office longer. For those who don't participate, it's an easy way to be excluded and being labelled "not fun". Office parties encourage employees to bring along their friends and families. The same goes for sports events. While some love to socialize with colleagues outside of work, that's definitely not for everyone. Again, while it can promote togetherness, it also causes cliques to be formed. The lack of clear boundaries can also be a fast track to burn-out, although most employees are too young to have experienced (or care about it), or they do not mind melding work and their private lives. Diversity and inclusion are major threads running through the company. A good initiative that's hampered by the idea that inclusion and equality stop at gender and sexuality, but mostly gender. People with a different personality who differ from the norm are often treated as outcasts, especially if these people do not participate in the many social events (outside of work hours). I doubt that happens on purpose, but it definitely happens. While that's to be expected, there have been occasions in which a manager called out a person (an engineer) for not smiling enough. The reason was that others thought the person was perceived to be intimidating by not having a friendly face. There are also not too many people over the age of 35-40 within the company, especially in engineering roles. Email threads with several dozen or even a hundred people who all hit "Reply All" are very common, especially when congratulating people on promotions or when people join the company. Fortunately, you can mute those conversations when they arrive but they are still annoying as they clog up your inbox. The same is true of mutual appreciation email threads. While it could be said such emails are to keep people informed and "celebrate wins", they usually only show that the group of included people was too large or that the bar for "celebrations" was really low. Hardly a thread goes by without a GIF or meme. "Lunch and Learn" sessions are terrible. Yes, the company pays for the lunch, which for some people is the sole reason to show up. But it's also a way to keep on working when you should really be resting your mind. In a sense, it's also insulting to the speaker who cannot eat during the usual lunch hour but has to talk to a group of people who are masticating and listening with half an ear. Let's not beat about the bush: middle management is incompetent. Apart from sitting in meetings most of the day, there is not a lot they achieve, if anything. Most employees have half an hour every other week when they talk to their superior in a one-on-one. Those times tend to be eaten up with inane questions about projects the managers have no real idea about but heard mentioned in a meeting by someone else. Furthermore, it's not uncommon these sessions are cancelled on short notice due to managers being too busy or away at another office. I have had three different managers in my time at Spotify and not one of my superiors had a notebook (or laptop) with them for jotting down notes during such a 1:1. If a piece of paper was needed, the room's post-its and Sharpies were used for that. There is hardly ever any follow-up because, well, I guess, they forget where they stuck the post-its after the meeting. The same goes for agile coaches. The company has dozens of them in most larger offices. What they do I don't know. They sometimes facilitate a retrospective for a team, but other than that they seem to be evangelists of productivity fads, such as the pomodoro technique. Every six months employees need to ask feedback from their coworkers, which as far as I have been able to determine is only because otherwise the managers have no idea of their underlings' achievements or performance. They are not involved in the "squad" (i.e. team) work and there is typically a product manager per team who does the day-to-day prioritization and stakeholder management, although the latter tends to be outsourced to employees too. The feedback is (as is to be expected when asking peers) fuzzy at best. People obviously don't take notes about their coworkers, so it's often a five-minute rehash of what they can remember from the past week or so, watered down by the fact that no one wants to go on record saying their colleague is a complete jerk. The feedback is not used as a means to cause changes in behaviour as that's left to the employee to decide whether they want to. While that's good as it leaves the employee in question in charge of their own (professional) development, it's also very loose, leading to no real change whatsoever. It mostly feels like an exercise in futility. You are required to fill in a sheet with accomplishments ahead of time, so that your manager can see what you did. It's also hard to accept the advice of a manager when that same manager hasn't the slightest idea what you did and whether you did it well - nor the means necessary to make such an assessment. Employees who do the work without making a big fuss about it often get short-changed: self-promotion is the way to make sure you're seen as a high performer, whether you actually did the work or not. Every year there is a reorganization within R&D, not because there is a specific need that needs to be addressed, but because it's reorg season. In most cases, these reorgs amount to nothing more than relabelling departments and shuffling a handful of people around. In the years I've been at the company I've seen a reorg every single year without having seen any tangible benefits. I understand there is no single organizational structure that solves all problems, but the rationale for reorgs is often lacking or at the very least not entirely clear. Even after several years it's opaque how decisions are made. Data-driven decision-making is a lie. One of the key insight is that although Spotify started off as a music streaming company, the actual work has very little to do with music for the overwhelming majority of engineers. Don't be fooled into thinking the company has a flat hierarchy either. From a regular engineer up to the C-suite are 5-6 people in some departments. That's not to say the company is overly focused on processes, although that's starting to increase as it grows (up).

    Continue reading
    Spotify2019-02-19
  8. Helpful (14)

    "Great Perks"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Software Engineer in New York, NY
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Spotify full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    - Free food - Trips to Stockholm - lots of activities

    Cons

    I am getting tired of the constant reorgs. My team had a great vibe and then was suddenly uprooted and hasn’t recovered. Morale is low across the company because of this. I’ve felt stuck in my role without advancement. Unhappy with manager who doesn’t seem to be able to help or provide any guidance on moving forward.

    Continue reading
    Spotify2018-12-09
  9. Helpful (6)

    "Senior Software Engineer"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Senior Software Engineer in Stockholm, Stockholm
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    No Opinion of CEO

    I have been working at Spotify full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    They pay reasonable salaries for being Stockholm although definitely not above average. The environment is good and people are friendly. If you have worked for Spotify you will be attractive on the market.

    Cons

    The stock options program could be better, it is a joke. It feels like the competence in the company is steadily declining, and the bar is being lowered all the time for new employees. The secrecy around salary bands is frustrating, and it is hard to know whether it is worth the effort to advance in the steps program given that you have no idea how it will affect your salary.

    Spotify2018-12-16
  10. Helpful (8)

    "Finance"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in New York, NY
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Spotify full-time

    Pros

    Cool office, great perks, new employees get a trip to Stockholm, 6 month maternity leave, cool events and parties. Fridge is always stacked with beer and wine. Free lunch, snacks, soda, breakfast everyday. You occasionally get a free shirt or some sort of swag here or there. We also get the occasional performance and celebrity sighting. Video games galore. Ping pong is popular in the office. Aside from that, the people I work with are wonderful. Not only are they great work wise , but they know how to have fun too. Can’t complain about management either. My managers are always looking out for us and want to see us grow and progress in our careers. Things are always changing at Spotify, which is great because you are never bored. There’s always something changing or something new happening that might impact your work. I see this as a good thing since it keeps you on your toes and provides you with more exposure in a sense. Overall, pretty cool and awesome place to work for.

    Cons

    Finance tends to work some long hours, especially during month end close. This might interfere with any fun Spotify happy hours or events, but not the biggest deal since there’s always events. Also, working late is pretty standard with most finance positions.

    Spotify2018-11-18
Found 23 reviews