TPP "no one" Reviews | Glassdoor.co.uk

TPP Employee Reviews about "no one"

Updated 10 Dec 2018

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4.1
75%
Recommend to a Friend
75%
Approve of CEO
TPP CEO  Frank Hester
Frank Hester
114 Ratings
Pros
  • "As well as the work the pay is great, good holidays including Xmas, sailing trips and travel to places I never thought I would(in 15 reviews)

  • "There is a genuinely flat hierarchy, although more experienced people's opinions tend to be more respected than others(in 14 reviews)

Cons
  • "flat hierarchy’ they preach about is a joke(in 15 reviews)

  • "No one really has a good grasp on projects as a whole, everything is rushed short-term jerk reactions to individual issues(in 11 reviews)

More Pros and Cons

Reviews about "no one"

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  1. Helpful (98)

    "Know what you're getting into"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Software Developer 
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at TPP full-time for more than 5 years

    Pros

    I was a Software Developer at TPP for over 5 years and, whilst there were many positives for me during that time, it is ultimately not a place I would recommend unless you know exactly what you’re getting yourself into. That’s not the same as saying that I regret my time there (I don’t) it just means that in order to stay long-term you will increasingly have to compromise on things that you will likely not be comfortable with. I don't regret leaving, either. I wondered whether to bother leaving a review at all, especially given that it will probably be discredited as “just another bitter ex-employee”, but I think it’s important to share my perspective – especially given how often Glassdoor was mentioned during my time at TPP. For the record, I don’t agree with everything that's said in other negative reviews - I think there are plenty that are overly harsh and one-sided. The same is true of many of the 5-star ones too, however, which massage some of the facts and deliberately leave out the negatives (except for the stock phrase "sometimes it can be stressful" - is that seriously your best attempt at balance?) I hope that by leaving a well-balanced account of my experiences, I can help to explain why the reviews on here are so polarised and seemingly contradictory. So, here are the pros and reasons why I stayed: • Learning to code. I started with 0 experience and so, outdated as the technologies are, it was still all new to me. I would say that for at least the first couple of years I was actively learning and engaged by what I was working on. After this it became more hit-and-miss, but there were still highlights amongst the more tedious tasks. The learning (at a high level) did come to a rather abrupt halt, though. • The people. It's true that most people you work with are just wonderful. Intelligent, committed to helping you out and a pleasure to hang out with both within and outside of the workplace. I will remain firm friends with lots of them, including a handful still working there. • The perks. At times where I was feeling my enthusiasm for the company wain, things like upcoming sailing trips, office parties and pay reviews were the sorts of things that made you think "ah, I'll stick it out a bit longer". The pay is obscene and will only continue to rise, and the sailing trips really were the envy of all my friends for a few years! Those who have been there 10+ years will be on obscene salaries that they couldn't help to match elsewhere. Ultimately, though, towards the end the main thing that kept me was: • Inertia. Leaving a job is a big decision, and I think people are surprisingly good at compartmentalising and justifying away their concerns. It's just easier to let the weeks go by rather than drawing your line in the sand and saying, finally, "enough is enough". I became very good at cognitive dissonance in the last few years of my time there, and I think those who stay longer must have it completely mastered!

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    Cons

    I think a lot of these cons will become easier to understand if they are framed in the right way, so I'm just going to be blunt and say it: TPP is Frank's personal playground. He is the sole CEO and has full autonomy. On top of this, he is aware that the company needs very few employees to function - he's even bragged as much in whole company meetings. Just a handful of helpdesk staff and a few developers to keep the UK system ticking over is all that's required to keep the money flooding in. Hence no one is indispensable, and anyone can go from his number 1 employee to fired with one "wrong" move. With that said, onto some specifics: • The turnover rate is just not normal, and I have numbers to bear this out. I kept track of the comings and goings of developers, at first just to prove to myself that 'everything was ok', and later out of morbid curiosity when it became clear that they really weren't. I'm not allowed to share these in great detail (against the community guidelines), but I can say that I saw more than 90 developers leave or get fired during my time there. I calculated that the overall retention for software developers over the course of my employment was a mere 32.9%. Anecdotally speaking, it's even worse for other teams - I can only think of about 5 analysts who are still there from when I started - but I don't have precise numbers. I can also say that many developers who left within the last few years were very experienced - many over 5 years, in some cases over 10. This definitely doesn’t add up to a “growing company” (quite the opposite - the coding team was substantially smaller when I left than it was when I started), nor does it fit with the defence of “occasionally we get it wrong, but the majority don’t leave”. Something more is going on here! Why is there no outcry from those still there, then? Well, like all companies, sometimes people *are* fired from TPP legitimately, and the clever thing they do is to get others involved in this process as early in their career as possible. It contributes to an ‘inner circle’ feeling that they propagate in those they want to keep, as well as helping to justify away the horrific leaver rate in that person’s mind. Once you’ve been a part of the decision to fire someone due to legitimate performance concerns, it becomes very easy to assume the same process is being followed in all other cases (it isn’t). Cognitive. Dissonance. • Sexism and racism from the CEO. It does go on, and it does get ignored on a regular basis. People say “oh, that’s just Frank” and shrug it off like he’s making harmless comments, but in doing so they are just covering their backs and becoming part of the problem. It’s particularly bad at office parties once alcohol gets involved, but even outside of these settings inappropriate comments get made and nobody calls him out on it. He made a joke about Harvey Weinstein at a Christmas party – apparently completely missing the point that trivialising abuse towards women is precisely the reason people like that can get away with it for so long. And it’s not just sweeping statements in speeches – I’ve heard vulgar remarks made towards individuals about their appearance, or what he would like to do with/to them, and so on. He will proudly boast about being sexually attracted to many of his employees. The company will retort by asking where are the lawsuits? But as more and more of these stories come to light (Phillip Green, most recently), it’s clear that it isn’t that simple – in most cases, people will simply lack evidence to make it any more than a he-said, she-said scenario. Not to mention the huge social stigma attached with filing a case in the first place – it’s easy to see why it might not happen even under really awful circumstances. • Micromanagement. It is said that the definition of insanity is trying the same thing over and over again and expecting different results, and yet this is exactly what TPP do. There are regular long meetings on such exciting topics as: o Why aren't the coders getting through enough work? o Why are new coders leaving - are they getting enough help/support? The discussions, and ultimate 'solutions', that are put forth in these meetings are always the same and never work. If we want the coders to work faster, they need to be more selfish and less distracted. They just need to "try harder". But, someone might say, I spent my whole morning helping new people on my team - that's ok, right? No, that's not what we discussed - we need to get through more work - that's the most important thing! So now new starters are getting fired or leaving, and we're in the meeting about that. Who has a guilty conscience about not helping new people well enough? About not taking enough time to make sure they understood and were picking things up? Hands are raised. This is unacceptable! New coders must be looked after - that's the most important thing! No one ever clocks the contradiction, or if they do they ignore it, and so the cycle repeats. This is just one example of many. I was talking to some ex-colleagues the other day who mentioned that the "coder work rate" discussions were back in full force and I had to suppress a smile - I really won't miss them! • Outdated coding practises, and a resistance to changing this that comes from the very top. Other reviews would seem to contradict this - they talk a lot about their ethos of “if you don’t like something, change it” - but this at best a lie of omission. It’s something that’s easily believed, because it really does go on (at a small scale) all the time. I would often move to new teams and observe something that I thought should be changed about the way we were working, and it was easy enough to make a change and give it a go. But – and it’s a big but – this stops very suddenly (and quite unpredictably) if you try to do something that Frank disagrees with. This includes most attempts to modernise their coding practices – trying to introduce industry standard approaches such as code reviews or unit testing are simply a no-go, regardless of overwhelming evidence for them being good ideas. Frank cannot stomach them, I think largely because they’re not his own ideas and because he can’t see past his belief that TPP are at the “bleeding edge”. They’re not, for what it’s worth – if you have a computer science background or have done coding before, you will find working at TPP very strange. People who put these ideas forward either back down and admit that they were “mistaken” (bowing down to a mixed bag of logical fallacies and woolly thinking), or they stick to their guns and get fired.

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    Advice to Management

    Unfortunately, there’s nothing meaningful I can write here. You know exactly what you’re doing and I suspect, unfortunately, it will continue to work. With a fresh management team this place has the potential to be a fantastic job for life, but until then it only succeeds in creating the temporary illusion of one. Short of a cosmic shift in attitude, nothing significant will change and employees will continue to be a disposable resource at the whim of the CEO. A real shame.

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    TPP2018-12-10
  2. Helpful (24)

    "Disorganised and frustrating"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - CSA 
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at TPP full-time

    Pros

    You’ll get more out of them than they get out of you. High salary, travel opportunities, nice people with the exception of a few at the top, introduction to interesting work.

    Cons

    - Certain directors can be vile at times. Lots of unnecessary and vindictive attacks on individuals, who are talked about with very personal and inappropriate in front of rooms full of other employees. - Never really know who to trust, encouraged to find fault with fellow employees at any opportunity. Tense atmosphere - very chaotic environment. No one really has a good grasp on projects as a whole, everything is rushed short-term jerk reactions to individual issues. Especially true of their international work (which is fun, but an enormous amount of work is expended for very little gain). Directions change according to the personal whim of directors and assertive individuals within each team. - Lots of fundamentally good principles (self-assessment, flat hierarchy) are transformed into a culty series of slogans and habits, and you end up spending a good chunk of your time filling in whiteboards and ‘highlighting’ why a five minute task has taken five and a half minutes. - Most new starters, and lots of people who have been there longer, get sacked very suddenly. This isn’t such a bad thing given you get paid for a couple of months, but if you’re looking for a career as opposed to a job don’t go anywhere near this company.

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    TPP2018-08-03
  3. Helpful (19)

    "Hellish Place"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Software Engineer 
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at TPP full-time

    Pros

    - High starting salary and benefits - Nice modern office in lovely area - Work with many intelligent people

    Cons

    There are many things I found difficult when working for the company, but I think that most of them stem from its structure. If you've read other review I'm sure you've heard it's a flat hierarchy - certainly ambitious but obviously difficult to implement. Perhaps in its early days, when the company was small and everybody was at a similar level in terms of writing code/industry experience, this structure worked well. The trouble is that there is an unhealthy proportion of new starters to experienced employees, and so giving everybody the same work and treating everybody the same results in over confident, often power seeking older workers and timid younger workers who are constantly trying (and mostly failing) to behave like the perfect 'TPP person'. The micromanagement to be this TPP person, defined however those with power see fit at the time, is horrendous - forget about working according to how you find you've worked best throughout your whole life, it's either their way, or you're out. An astonishing amount of very capable employees get fired any time within their first two years. The hours are reasonable (finish at 5.15 quite consistently) but there is an abnormal and ironically inefficient intensity to the work. You can work next to someone for a year and not know a single thing about them, just by the fact any non-work related talk is strongly discouraged. You will literally have to shout sorry to the entire floor if you are 1 minute late in the morning. On top of this, the coders are often required to be 'on call', which results in being woken quite regularly in the middle of the night and volunteering to go into the office. To question anything regarding the culture, or key technological issues of the company, is a huge mistake - you will either get mocked or in some cases, made to leave. It is much wiser to keep your head down and unnoticed, it is the CEO alone who makes any decisions of significant impact and no one else in the 'flat' hierarchy. If you've just come out of university and are unsure of what step next to take, my wholehearted advice would be to avoid this company like the plague. You will find neither happiness or a career.

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    Advice to Management

    Learn from the top tech companies. Evolve and take your employees needs more seriously - be more tolerant!

    TPP2018-08-12
  4. Helpful (30)

    "Horrific."

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee 
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at TPP full-time

    Pros

    Some lovely people (most of whom left/were fired), and the perks are really attractive to a grad out of university. ALL (bar the sailing) are widely available at other organisations.

    Cons

    When I tell people about my time here, they think I'm lying. It was truly horrific. The "management" are bullies. There was a server issue and I was on the phone to a client. I apologised and said I had to go and hung the phone up, and I was immediately screamed at by the CEO for not complying quickly enough. I was made to apologise in front of the room once the issue was cleared up. I argued back that I was being polite and it didn't take longer than 5 seconds, and was screamed and sworn at further. People regularly had to clean the glass doors as a punishment for accidentally smearing them. We were required (I believe the phrase was "volunteer") to come in out of hours, even if we were busy. If we didn't come in, we were called into a room to explain why. No one ever had a valid excuse, so black marks were always put against people's names (I was away in York one time and this wasn't a good enough reason for not coming back to help out). Battery dying/phone being off were met with derision. TPP also stipulate that you must live within a certain radius of the office. There was some heavy snowfall that affected public transport so that - even though people lived in the required area - staff couldn't make it into work. One colleague walked for two hours in the snow and was told he "should have left earlier". Those that didn't try the schlep were told not to come back. At one point we had to write logs of our daily activity including how long we were spending in the toilet. So many people quit/were fired in the first months I worked here. The CEO told one of my colleagues (who walked the week before I did) that the turnover was so high that they were forced to lie about it as it looked that bad - apparently he seemed rather proud of this fact? We were encouraged to review our colleagues when we'd been out on site visits with them - if management seemed to be taking a dislike to an individual, they encouraged you to be outright negative. Subsequently you never saw that individual again, Training was all in-house, basic and hurried. Following this we were sent out into the field really quickly. On site, we'd often encounter frustrated customers who'd use our visits as an opportunity to vent their concerns because when they tried to contact the support teams directly they were being ignored. They failed to file my paperwork properly also once I had left, resulting in lots of to-ing and fro-ing with HMRC after I'd quit. HR is an absolute joke, and no one cares about your well being. Contrary to some of the "authentic" five-star reviews on here suggesting that colleagues well being is a) on themselves and b) the responsibility of everyone, fundamentally it's down to lines of management and HR. There is no one there to help you out, and everyone is out for themselves because of the toxic culture that has built up.

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    Advice to Management

    Change your management team. Seriously.

    TPP2018-03-14
  5. Helpful (7)

    "5* for some people 1* for others, read and decide if it's for you."

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Software Developer in Leeds, England
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at TPP full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    TPP is weird , and it's weird in a way that's perfect for some people but terrible for others. I think that's why all the reviews are 1* or 5*. - The culture is incredibly direct, everything is up for immediate debate, criticism or interruption with no beating around the bush. - There is a genuinely flat hierarchy, although more experienced people's opinions tend to be more respected than others. - The work is interesting and you get involved in important projects from day one, but you can shout (literally) for help any time you get stuck. - Everyone treats teaching new people as a top priority, as almost no one starts with any software experience. You work on a wide range of projects so you learn lots of different skills. - Everyone is young, bright, committed and on the ball, there's nobody useless and everyone works together. - You can change any process you find difficult or annoying, and it's too small a company to have any bureaucracy. It's amazing how much you can get done when you don't have to call meetings for every decision and wait weeks for managers to sign off on everything. - It's a small enough company that you can know everyone and there's a fantastic team spirit, which is helped by all the work social events, pub trips and sailing. - The benefits, pay and working conditions are great. - The product is really good and it feels good every time you help improve healthcare in the UK or China.

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    Cons

    A lot of the criticism on here is overblown, but there are some drawbacks. - When you're having a bad day (or doubting yourself) being told you've done something wrong hurts. Some people take directness to the level of being rude, not least Frank the CEO. - People who don't learn seem to be making progress get fired with very little warning, especially int the first six months. Combined with the fact that no one works their notice this seems like people suddenly disappear for no reason, which is horrible. - There aren't really enough people to do a lot of the basic jobs you'd like to do like fixing minor yet annoying bugs. - A couple of times a month there's an emergency which results in a conference call in the middle of the night and some people going to the office. - As a new person you'll end up doing a shift on the helpdesk over Christmas or during things like office parties. - You get interrupted a lot, and work on lots of different tasks, which some people find very difficult. - There is no progression of job titles. There are generous pay rises and more responsibility comes naturally but you won't directly manage people. - None of the training is externally recognised, which makes it less transferable. - Lots of the rules (e.g. on phones not on silent) are overly strict

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    Advice to Management

    - Keep the unique culture, but try and make it more inclusive. - Make sure criticism is always constructive and make it a bit gentler on peoples feelings. Remember nobody's perfect!

    TPP2017-09-16
  6. Helpful (25)

    "Sad times at TPP"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Horsforth, England
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at TPP full-time for more than 8 years

    Pros

    Great if you can't get a job as there are always job vacancies available. As nearly every day I use to have emails sent saying; persons name has left the company. We would all know they had been sacked, you would get other emails saying there was a collection this meant they resigned. Get pay rises to write good company reviews.

    Cons

    Sad to see a company that makes loads of money out of the NHS, waste this money. You should invest some off this money back into the NHS, not waste it on elaborate parties, trips and alcohol. I love alcohol don't get me wrong but encouraging huge amounts of alcohol every night surely isn't that great for the staff or their customers. Workplace bullying happens all the time, if they want you out they will gradually start being really horrible and pick you up on everything like touching the glass or splashing water around the sink in the toilets. It then starts to get worse if you then don't leave they then sack you. There is no trained HR staff in the whole company! if an outside HR company was brought in it would solve some of the TPP's current and ongoing issues. No loyalty, no one is your friend it's like a cult you become a TPP Zombie they'll stab you in the back for a pay rise. But don't worry you know it will happen to them at some point. Out of date compared to TPP's competitors.

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    Advice to Management

    Give up!

    TPP2016-07-17
  7. Helpful (38)

    "Getting sacked from this place was the best thing that ever happened to me"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Former Employee - Software Developer in Leeds, England
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook

    I worked at TPP full-time for less than a year

    Pros

    The other 1 star reviews are accurate about the perks. I will say that if you are willing to totally embrace the company's rituals you might find some satisfaction in your time there. At its core there are some really solid principles to be found in the TPP experience - learning by doing, asserting oneself, not hesitating to ask for help, giving simple answers to simple questions - but there are deep, abiding flaws too. Enduring the boot camp that is the first few months is one way (probably not the best way) of learning two industry standard programming languages from scratch, which is lucky because you can expect to make use of them for better things before long.

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    Cons

    The CEO might be a genuinely talented entrepreneur and not a horrible person, but he has utterly failed to set an example as a manager. He has encouraged his underlings to mimic his brash and obnoxious personality but has allowed them to do so in a way that is completely devoid of humanity, charisma or respect. These are in fact the kind of people who are so vicious and petty as to publicly vilify someone for saying 'excuse me' when interrupting a meeting. The supposedly flat organizational structure gives rise to the domination a few professional bullies who suddenly find themselves untethered from the responsibility of preserving the well being, job satisfaction or dignity of the people they give orders to. Disagreeing with one of these people for any reason will put you on the hit list, which is particularly twisted when you consider that part of the projected company ethos is that, as an employee, you can speak up about anything if you feel it's not right. Admittedly there are plenty of places to work where the old trope of 'you can have an opinion once you've been here 10 years' holds true, but at least it's not the ruthless free for all that TPP has engendered. Their version control is laughably antiquated and as a result their continuous release strategy is hectic and downright dangerous. It takes a pathological level of denial on the part of senior developers to emphasize the company line of safety, stability and security while assuring juniors that there is absolutely no need for automated testing (because it's hard and takes too long - this the actual reasoning that was given), code reviews involving more than 1 developer, or any other standard safeguarding processes. The technical architecture of the product is an absolute train wreck because vast tracts of it have been written by well meaning rookies whose mistakes no one has bothered to correct. Things will only get worse as the ratio of experience to population plummets - most starters don't stay around long enough to become particularly knowledgeable, and those who have the knowledge are fleeing like rats off a sinking ship. The level of infraction on technical staff's personal lives by being always on call is a huge burden that not nearly enough is done to mitigate. If you're the sort of person who doesn't like to be woken up at 3AM on a Saturday to have a conversation about stored procedures then you're probably not the sort of person who wants to work for TPP. I understand it's a necessary evil because of the nature of the work they do (although that may just be folklore, who knows with these people), and I respect the effort put in by the technical team to meet those demands, but at some point you have to question if it's worth it. The only reason TPP gets away with its atrocious culture and treatment of employees is because it attracts unseasoned graduates, particularly ones which haven't had any contact with software development before, who think that it's as good as it gets. At TPP it's considered normal to feel harassed and distressed. At TPP it's considered normal to report to someone who treats you like a nuisance. At TPP it's considered normal to send an email to the entire company because you committed some arbitrary transgression like touching the glass on the doors. In case there are any TPP employees out there who haven't got the message - that is not normal. I would only recommend TPP to a friend if I wanted to show them what a failed communist state might look like.

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    Advice to Management

    Adopt a proper team structure, don't take for granted everything that you hear from senior staff, upgrade your source control, start writing automated tests, stop making developers answer support calls, some refactoring wouldn't hurt, and stop asking employees to lie for you on surveys.

    TPP2016-01-12
  8. Helpful (42)

    "Out dated development and no respect or consideration for employees"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Software Developer in Horsforth, England
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook

    I worked at TPP full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    In fairness to TPP there are some fantastic perks. This makes it particularly odd that they offer these but don't treat employees right day to day.

    Cons

    All the one star reviews on here are accurate and the five star reviews (The last batch of three conveniently all being posted within a week of each other) are clearly faked or forced. This is a perfect example of how TPP likes to control any perceptions of them not being the perfect company that they constantly tell you that they are and how they will blame everyone else but themselves for any negativity directed towards them. TPP tries to exhibit itself as a company that really looks after their staff and gives them the best possible working environment. An example of this is the line that is often used about how the company does the best companies questionnaire to find out what workers are unhappy about anomalously so that they can be improved upon rather than for any ratings or rewards. This sounds absolutely amazing but unfortunately it is a total scam. Yes there are talks with the CEO to go through the negative comments but nothing ever comes of these apart from being a means to identify unsatisfied employees who will eventually be gotten rid of. Instead you are lectured about how unfair it is to have said these things and how they are not true. Last time round a significant amount of comments mentioned being publicly humiliated and instead of trying to improve the terrible working culture, we were all just told that it was a few people being over sensitive, gossiping and conspiring to give negative reviews. As you can see from comments here, TPP also has a major reputation for frequent unfair and immoral dismissals. To combat this new workers have the mantra that no one gets fired without good cause and several warnings drilled into them and there have also been several talks with the CEO about how they try to avoid firing people at all costs, to just trust that they are doing it all morally and to be wary of tales from former employees who think the company is evil. At the time you naively believe this as you think OK a company does have to make hard decisions but having experienced the firing process myself I can confirm that all of these are blatant and deliberate lies and everything that people are saying about the company is true. There was of course no warning and the reasons for my dismissal read like evidence at a witch trial with lots of 'I thinks' rather than any firm evidence. It's painfully clear that the same thing has happened with so many brilliantly talented and friendly colleagues in the past. I'm also sure that since I left my name too has been besmirched in order to absolve senior management of any blame or unfairness. Another facet that the company unjustifiable prides itself on is being innovative and developing in the best possible way. Since looking for other jobs I have realised that this couldn't be further from the truth. The company's technology and development processes are so far behind the vast majority of other software houses to the point where interviewers are shocked when you describe your previous software development experience. There is no automated testing, rudimentary version control, a lack of any proper training and you won't be working on any of the latest technology. Be very careful because this lack of experience and knowledge can severely affect your employability to any employers who are not prepared to train you up. Despite this TPP were very set in their way that how they worked was the best and unkeen to advance themselves. As they only ever hire people without previous software development experience no one has anything to compare the work environment to and no one ever comes in with the right knowledge to implement the better practices and organisation used by most other companies. Don't fall for the propaganda of TPP. They say that they only hire the brightest and best and try to keep them on by creating an amazing working environment but it is all a lie as these highly intelligent workers are treated like children, belittled, bullied and forced to tears. No respect is given to their personal lives when sending them away internationally with a days notice, forcing them to work weekends without overtime or time back and choosing where they can live.

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    Advice to Management

    Nothing as I know none will be followed as senior management clearly cares more about covering up what it is really like to work here than to actually improve things for staff.

    TPP2015-07-16
  9. Helpful (44)

    "Don't Fall For The Five-Star Reviews"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Software Developer in Leeds, England
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook

    I worked at TPP full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    1) The company has a good reputation as an innovative software house, with consistently high placement in the Times 100 Best Companies competition. 2) The work itself can be rewarding, with your work ultimately helping to save lives. It can be quite a powerful experience to hear from a doctor how a patient's life was saved because of the software from your company. You'll also be given responsibilities from your first day, being expected to manage your own time and taking ownership for clients and projects. 3) The vast majority of the staff are nice, likeable people who genuinely want to do a good job. Working here, you'll get to know loads of great new people. 4) The company culture encourages good habits, like honesty, straight-talking and openness. If you make a mistake, you're encouraged to be honest about it. If someone else makes a mistake, you're encouraged to point it out. If you see someone you don't recognise, you ask who they are. 5) The working hours are generally good, with a firm 08:30 start and 17:15 finish. It's not one of those places where you're expected to be putting in extra hours every night, just to keep up. 6) The office environment is pretty good, with an open plan style and good quality chairs and equipment. Also, a new office is being built, which will provide lots of extra space (and parking). 7) There are a number of nice perks in addition to the salary, including five days external training per year, private healthcare, free drinks on Friday nights, free Friday cooked breakfasts, free fitness classes, fun parties and even free haircuts. 8) Finally, the pay can end up very good. Although the starter salary isn't that brilliant (or little better than elsewhere), it can go up by a decent amount each year, with no real upper limit.

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    Cons

    After reading the above positive things, you might be wondering why my one star rating. That's because all those positive points have a massive "BUT..." following them. 1) The company has a good reputation, BUT this reputation is fading and based on past successes. Many of the things you'll learn are either non-standard or outmoded, so aren't especially useful to take to another job. And the Best Companies results are an outcome of endless "coaching" sessions, so take that result with a pinch of salt. Do the same with the five-star reviews shown on this site. 2) The work itself can be rewarding, BUT also punishingly difficult. There's zero training given to new starters, and although most people are extremely helpful, you are thrown into the deep end on your first day. The company is also incredibly reactive, chopping and changing plans on an almost daily basis. Although this is dressed up as a positive thing, in reality it just means that lots of time is spent adjusting and re-focusing, rather than productively working. This has been made worse recently, by the huge number of staff “leaving”, since their work has to be picked up without any warning. 3) The vast majority of staff are nice, BUT the senior management are capricious, secretive and can treat people like dirt. Many staff have been reduced to tears by the humiliation and insults they receive from them. Also, a huge number of staff have left this year (including two directors) with no notice, warning or information as to why. The senior management have tried to stamp down on staff speculating on why people have left (rather than being open about it), which has just resulted in a culture of paranoia, as no one knows who could be next, or even if they’re next. 4) The company culture encourages good habits, BUT these are taken to aggressive extremes. Having a policy of allowing staff to interrupt meetings if they need to talk to someone is a great idea. But this has been taken to the insane level of forbidding people from saying “sorry” (upon pain of being reprimanded) when they do interrupt. Having a policy of talking in a clear, concise manner is great. But using this as carte blanche to bellow insults into someone’s face is not so great. 5) The working hours are generally good, BUT all you can end up having to stay away (for up to several weeks) with little or no notice. You may be sent to London, and have to stay over that night. Or you may be sent half way around the world. Additionally, technical staff are effectively on-call 24/7 for emergencies, and if you don't respond often or quickly enough (because maybe you were busy with your home life?) then expect to be reprimanded for it. There are also no opportunities for flexible working of any kind – you start and end at the same time as anyone else. 6) The office environment is pretty good, BUT (for all the office-based roles) you must relocate to within a small radius around the office in North West Leeds. This does include some nice suburbs, but if you can't/won't relocate, then you can't work there. 7) There are quite a few nice perks, BUT they are just perks. A free bacon sandwich doesn't make up for being treated badly, and the training allowance is now only used on team building (i.e. drinking) trips that the CEO chooses. Don't apply to work here based on any of the perks. 8) The pay can end up very good, BUT you almost certainly won't be there long enough to see it reach that level. Each year, there's a new crop of graduates, a fair proportion of who don't last more than a few months. Another proportion leave after a year or so, realising that the demands of the job aren't compatible with starting a family or worth the constant strain of walking on eggshells around the senior management. If all the above hasn't put you off and you do send in your CV, then just try to treat this job as a stepping stone on to better things. Don't plan on being there more than a few years and really keep in mind that you could be out of a job at any moment before making any big commitments (like buying a house).

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    Advice to Management

    Keep doing what you're doing. Eventually you'll run out of staff and it'll just be yourselves, shouting at each other in that vast new office.

    TPP2015-07-13
  10. Helpful (30)

    "Hideous place to work"

    StarStarStarStarStar
     
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook

    I have been working at TPP

    Pros

    It is close to the train station and the security guard is ace!

    Cons

    The CEO and his two minions are bullies and they are awful to people to work with. There is a culture of fear and it makes you feel sick having to deal with them. You are expected to do the work of five people and not complain because 'it's variety'. If you decide to have an opinion that goes against what the aforementioned three think then you're done for. They will go out of their way to find 'evidence' on you and then you'll either be bullied out of the company or fired. I have seen this happen to so many of my colleagues it's really upsetting and there is nothing you can do. People are so stressed out but feel trapped either because of the money or lack of experience so couldn't find another job. There is no-one to support you because the middle management want those higher up to love them so they will go out of their way to push people under the bus so it can get them brownie points. If you want to keep your sanity then stay away from this place.

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    Advice to Management

    Listen to these reviews, it's the only time people are being honest with you. Everyone in that company is frightened of upper management and hates having to work them.

    TPP2015-04-10
Found 11 reviews
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