TPP Employee Reviews about "working at tpp"

Updated Oct 10, 2021

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Found 29 of over 251 reviews

2.3
21%
Recommend to a Friend
23%
Approve of CEO
TPP CEO  Frank Hester
Frank Hester
170 Ratings
Pros
  • "I'd genuinely recommend working at TPP to anyone who's looking for a truly rewarding job where you feel like you're making a real difference(in 21 reviews)

  • "high starting salary when you start(in 16 reviews)

  • Cons
  • "The so called 'flat hierarchy' is just a recruitment scam(in 20 reviews)

  • "Due to the fake positive reviews, it can be hard to judge the truth but I can assure you that the negative reviews are sadly all true(in 15 reviews)

  • More Pros and Cons
    Pros & Cons are excerpts from user reviews. They are not authored by Glassdoor.

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    Being a woman in tech, I only recently started advocating for myself at work about advancement opportunities. Because of this I wanted to ask this question to my male counterparts. When you have 1:1's with your direct reports and talk about career growth / aspirations what is your managers’ response typically? I’d like to gauge how my experience (negative) differs from others. For instance are you met with blockades, enthusiasm, dread, etc?

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    Reviews about "working at tpp"

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    1. 5.0
      Former Employee, more than 10 years

      Fantastic

      Oct 8, 2021 - Senior Clinical Systems Analyst in Horsforth, England
      Recommend
      CEO Approval
      Business Outlook

      Pros

      I worked at TPP for 14 years and left about 9 months ago to start a new chapter working in the outdoors, I wanted to write this after I had left and become self-employed as I could offer a unique perspective without any influence from the company. I would strongly recommend a career at TPP to anyone that wants to work in the IT industry. The work they do leads to real world benefits, and you can directly see the things you work on helping people. You will also be part of a team that is extremely passionate about what they do and who deeply care about the product they produce. I wouldn’t have left TPP to work for a different company in IT, I felt at home and if I had wanted to remain in the industry I would have preferred to stay there. I knew that if I ever had a problem either personal or professional, I could tell anyone (especially the management team), and they would do what they could to help. Long story short I am very lucky to have had the chance to work in this team, I have learnt a lot and experienced some fantastic things, the pay was excellent, and you would be missing out if you didn’t give it a go.

      Cons

      It’s not easy, you will be challenged, expected to give your best and say what you think. You will also need to be as passionate and committed as everyone around you. This can mean it’s not for everyone, as it leads you to putting pressure on yourself to perform well and seeing your own mistakes can be tough. Don’t let that put you off trying though, most people would say they want a job that challenges them and that helps people. It’s also worth saying when things go well you see the rewards!

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      8 people found this review helpful
    2. 1.0
      Current Employee, less than 1 year

      I hoped the reviews weren’t true… they are

      Oct 10, 2021 - Business Analyst in Leeds, England
      Recommend
      CEO Approval
      Business Outlook

      Pros

      I enjoyed working in healthcare a lot; experienced CSA teammates were often mindful of giving new starters useful experience/learning opps as much as possible; salary; benefits; work can be stimulating (although not many transferable skills); Very reasonable hours (although for the three weeks I was there I didn’t have to do out of hours stuff so maybe the work life balance would’ve become worse with time); cross-disciplinary collaboration (ie lots of work with coders) It’s a shame because there are positives to working at TPP and it could be a very decent graduation position. You might decide to join the company thinking it’s worth the risk of a bad experience.

      Cons

      My contract was terminated three weeks after I started. I was not told what the problem was as the HR reps could only give me the ‘information they had access to’ (it was very much a don’t shoot the messenger act). That morning, my team had given me work to do for the rest of the week so I assume they were unaware I was about to be fired. I emailed several times afterwards to follow up on why I was fired and got a generic response about my performance not being reflective of TPP’s core values. When I asked for specifics I got no response. Another new starter had their contract terminated a few days before me with no explanation too. I probably wasn’t there long enough to speculate on whether the directors are as 'evil' as some reviews on here say they are. But I can say that all new starters realise within a couple of weeks that you will never feel at ease at TPP. It’s quite sinister receiving emails that ‘Person X has left TPP’ knowing that you could be next even if you have done nothing wrong. As the salary is good, new starters often sign 12-month leases for nice expensive apartments. Then you join the company and realise how precarious your position is. But you’ve got a £800-900pcm 12-month lease to pay. The CEO (Frank) and the MD addressed the glass door reviews in a talk with me and other new starters during my second week. Frank told us a lengthy anecdote about an employee he’d unfortunately had to sack and who he later bumped into at the pub. They got into a chat and the former employee was initially very angry at Frank for how he’d been treated at TPP. However, once Frank corrected his version of events reminding him of what had really happened, the former employee calmed down a lot and said, ‘oh yeah, you’re right Frank. That is what happened.’ According to Frank, the moral of this story was that people often ‘misremember’ things. So, we didn’t need to worry about the glass door reviews because that was just people misremembering things. Frank also clarified that he didn’t care what people were saying about TPP on Glassdoor in any case. In the same talk with the new starters, Frank acknowledged that some employees got these weird pangs of paranoia and started to worry about getting fired. One employee had recently come to Frank and said to him ‘you know that weird feeling you mentioned I might get, Frank? Well, I’m getting it.’ Because the employee was honest and upfront, Frank was able to have an open conversation with him and put his mind at ease, and they all lived happily ever after. I’m ashamed to say that, despite everything, I felt a bit reassured by this story. True, things were looking a bit sinister at TPP, but if I ever felt like my position was in jeopardy maybe I could just talk it over with one of the directors. 5 working days later, one of the new starters who Frank told this story to on the patio was fired without warning. 2 working days after that, I was. I know that I said I wouldn’t speculate on whether the management at TPP were ‘evil’, but after my contract was terminated I thought about how twisted it was that Frank told us the story about employee paranoia. Obviously, he will have known that there was a good chance several of us would likely be sacked for no reason in a matter of weeks/days. Really seems like he was just pacifying the cattle before leading them to the abattoir.

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      58 people found this review helpful
    3. 2.0
      Former Employee

      Get in and get out

      Jul 12, 2020 - Software Developer 
      Recommend
      CEO Approval
      Business Outlook

      Pros

      Few companies are willing to hire candidates for all roles with no prior experience and virtually none with such a high starting salary. This means that your CV and bank account can look pretty good within a few months of leaving uni. The vast majority of people working at TPP are very pleasant and intelligent. Many new hires move to Leeds to work at TPP, myself included, so it’s nice to be surrounded by like-minded people and it’s easy to make good friends. It feels good knowing that the work you’re doing everyday is having a positive impact on society. I can think of few sectors more objectively ethical than healthcare. There are other superficial perks, such as bimonthly massages, free pub Fridays and annual recreational trips abroad.

      Cons

      All of TPP’s problems can be traced back to its CEO, Frank Hester. The man is deeply insecure and wants nothing more than a band of kowtowing drones to feed his ego. It’s apparent that Frank has few people to associate with outside of work and longs to make friends with his employees, though the feeling is rarely mutual. Several employees have spoken of late-night phone calls from him, which never have anything to do with actual work, but rather whatever happens to be on Frank’s mind. This alone would be a sizeable invasion of privacy, but throw in the fact that Frank is often intoxicated and/or looking to dig up dirt on whichever employee he is currently suspecting of dissent and you're looking at a CEO with absolutely no concept of what’s appropriate. Not only does Frank often make racist or sexist “jokes”, but he revels in his Trumpian filter and expects you to laugh alongside him. Failure to comply can be seen as grounds for dismissal. Virtually none of the longstanding employees engage in non-mandatory company social events, presumably to avoid having to socialise with Frank and risk getting on his bad side, however unintentional it may be. TPP maintains that it has a flat hierarchy, which is half true. There are no managers, only employees and a handful of directors. More senior employees’ opinions will, perhaps naturally, be considered with more weight, but you can approach most anyone you need to at any time and they will generally listen to what you have to say. However, some of the more senior employees and directors have some sort of superiority complex and it shows. Their word is final and their reasoning on matters is usually little more than “this is the way we’ve always operated”. Such reluctance to change is frustrating at best and detrimental to the company at worst. It’s a common occurrence to see a director or senior employee openly berating another employee, which fosters an environment where disrespect is seen as par for the course. The directors themselves answer only to Frank, who himself mistreats them, thus completing the pyramid of abuse. Speaking up about any of this can be seen as a reason to sack you, which brings me to my next point. The turnover rate is absolutely abysmal. Since September 2017, there were probably around 100 new hires across all departments. At a push, maybe 15 remain at the time of writing. On top of this, the largest team, the coders, has plummeted from around 70 to 25 in three years. The reason for this egregious loss of life is, you guessed it, Frank. He boasts how he once attended a talk and appeared to be the only attendee to agree when the speaker suggested that any employee who is not right for the company should be terminated. Sadly, it seems that Frank has mistaken “the company” for “Frank” and will ruthlessly sack anybody who is even suspected of being against him in any way. You are fully expendable, and Frank will admit as much, often bragging that he only requires 14 employees to keep the business afloat. Perhaps for every three employees that are sacked, one leaves of their own volition, but of the twenty such people I’ve spoken to, none would recommend TPP as a nice place to work. Employees are often asked to write company reviews during work hours, including here on Glassdoor and for The Sunday Times Top 100 Small Companies to Work For award, which TPP are now banned from entering. While I can’t prove that several of these reviews are written by the same people, the similar rhetoric found time and time again would seem to suggest they are (perhaps there will be more verbose 5-star reviews dated after this review?). As for non-duplicate reviews, nobody will risk writing anything negative about the company at work for fear that a wandering director may spot it and end their employment on the spot. One of the perks listed here often is a good work-life balance. While it’s true that less than 40 hours a week is pretty reasonable for the salary that is offered, you are expected to be on call 24/7. This applies to some teams more than others, but suffice to say it’s hard not to think about work outside of work when it could phone you at any time. Given how many bugs make it into production code, late-night conference calls are not an uncommon occurrence. Coders get reimbursement for any hours they work outside of normal working hours, but the same can not be said for other teams, such as software support specialists or clinical systems analysts. The only reason I can think of for why this is the case is that most of the directors (Frank included) used to be coders themselves, so coders get special treatment. Many compare TPP to a cult, and for good reason. You are expected to pledge your unwavering allegiance to the company and to be a conduit through which the directors can enact their will. In your first week you will be taught more about the company’s idiosyncratic way of working than how to actually be a {insert job role here}. Not only that, but you are told to call others out when they make any sort of slip-up, creating a kind of autocratical informant culture. Certain types of mistake, such as writing bugs or failing to lock up, are rectified by publicly outing yourself to the rest of the company via email. Unsurprisingly, this does nothing to stop such mistakes happening again, but rather just makes people feel bad and causes unnecessary stress. Directors demand employees inform them immediately if they enter into a relationship with another employee. Their reason for making you do so is so they can make sure you don’t work on the same project to avoid distractions, but they expect this level of admission from any and all employees, regardless of how likely it is that their teams will ever work together. Employees have spoken about being interrogated regarding who they are friends with, because fraternising with ex-employees is a big no-no. I imagine the real reason for such an unsettling interest in employees’ personal lives is to have as much ammunition as possible against them once they unwittingly get on the directors’ bad side. Constant surveillance also bleeds into TPP’s way of working: you are encouraged to update your colleagues with what you are doing on a regular basis, as well as how long you think that task will take. While this may seem sensible on paper, in practice it means you’ll need a towel ready to wipe away all the moisture from your teammates breathing down your neck every ten minutes. Due to the very nature of estimation, you’ll essentially be setting your self several miniature deadlines a day and meeting very few of them. Therefore, you’ll go through many work days stressed and finish them feeling like you’ve failed. The atmosphere at TPP is very much that of a sheltered community. Many ex-employees are branded as “toxic” and are slandered in company meetings, with directors encouraging employees to bad-mouth people who were once their colleagues and whom they may still be in contact with. You are flat-out not allowed to socialise with those who used to work at TPP and being suspected of as much is enough to get you fired. If that doesn’t sound like a cult I don’t know what does. I suspect the primary reason that TPP predominantly hires graduates with no prior experience is because established industry professionals would instantly spot all the weird stuff that happens on a daily basis and leave soon after. This lack of context is further amplified by the fact that only a few computers in the office have access to the internet; apparently TPP employees know best when it comes to any questions you may have and searching the internet for answers is a last resort. Much of TPP’s reluctance to change stems from their deluded belief that they are the best company in the world. Frank recently claimed that the company was worth over £1 billion, which appears to be a gross overestimate if one takes a look at their public accounts. Company meetings are often filled with tirades about other organisations and how much worse than TPP they are. This same air of superiority extends to the way customers are treated, often being looked down upon as nuisances for whom only the bare minimum should be done. More evidence of TPP’s we-know-best attitude has surfaced during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. TPP has refused to follow government guidelines, requiring every single employee to come into the office every day, despite being in a sector that is perhaps best suited to working remotely. TPP has never invested in any infrastructure to support working from home and still has no interest in doing so, regardless of potential health risks to its employees. Frank loves to gloat about how much money the company makes, but is clearly not willing to use any of it to improve the lives of their employees past the odd event that looks good on social media. When questioned about their handling of COVID-19 by the Yorkshire Evening Post, TPP gave a limp excuse that staff have to work in the office, as the servers need to be extremely quick. Not only is this just untrue, as I’m sure would be evident to anyone who knows what a server is, but even if it was, surely it wouldn’t require every employee from every team to be in the office? To make matters worse, employees were not allowed to take their lunch break in the office during the pandemic, thus causing unnecessary foot traffic in the local area, potentially endangering its residents. Many of the above points compound on one another to create an environment of unspoken fear. Any day could be your last, as somebody is sacked up to once a week. To drive the point home, here is a list of outlandish reasons people have been sacked from TPP, in no particular order: - Complaining about how something is handled or suggesting that something could be improved - Not divulging aspects of their personal life - Being friends with ex-employees - Looking at Frank wrong - Being uncomfortable around Frank - Showing any sign of weakness during a stressful event - Being suspected of any of the above without any actual evidence For the sake of transparency, I don’t know TPP’s reasons for sacking everyone that they have, but the vast majority that I have spoken to fall under the above categories. Others have been sacked for the reason that they didn’t own up to mistakes or were defensive when questioned about something. While this may be TPP’s most valid reason for dismissal, it usually happens with those who have been employed for less than a year. The oppressive atmosphere does nothing to help such people feel comfortable and firing somebody after one mistake rather than taking action to help them improve is cold and cutthroat. The rest of the cons will cover the more technical aspects of working at TPP as a coder. You will be taught the basics of writing code and several good coding practices, but that's about it. Even the things they do teach you are drip-fed to you as and when you need to know them, so it’s really luck of the draw as to what you’ll pick up in your time at TPP. You will never be given time to just sit and read up on a concept. Apparently teaching you on such a need-to-know basis saves time, but ironically it likely ends up harming more than it helps in the long run, as you’ll constantly be badgering other employees to explain things to you. The codebase itself is ancient and it shows, with many arcane methods that nobody fully understands. This problem will never go away as time is never set aside to give the code the cleaning/refactoring it so desperately needs. Developers are referred to as coders, because you will learn nothing of the actual software development process. Industry standard practices such as automated testing, modern language features, build pipelines, containers, or modern version control are nowhere to be seen. In fact, the very mention of them is enough to get you sacked, as that would amount to suggesting that Frank isn't the utmost authority when it comes to software development. I had to spend about a month studying various aspects of software development to make experience mean anything elsewhere. Ultimately, TPP teaches you how to work at TPP, which unsurprisingly is not a skill that other companies are looking for. I’d recommend staying for around 6 months to get the basics of how to write code professionally and then using that experience to find employment somewhere better. The job security being what it is, staying any longer means risking being unemployed with a severely stunted skill set for the time that you’ve been working.

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      347 people found this review helpful
    4. 1.0
      Former Employee, more than 5 years

      Warning! Some things never change.

      Jul 2, 2021 - Software Developer in Leeds, England
      Recommend
      CEO Approval
      Business Outlook

      Pros

      one two three four five

      Cons

      Full disclosure, I left TPP over 6 years ago, a friend of mine who still works there mentioned a few goings on at TPP and that's what spurred me on to make this review. Unfortunately for those still working there it looks like nothing has changed for the better. Since leaving I have had a number of other coding jobs, and I can safely say that TPP was the worst experience of my life, working at TPP was a literal waste of time. It's a dead-end job, yes the pay is good, but there are no other positives about working here. I left around the time a number of analysts and coders were being culled for no other reason than to have opinions about the way they worked, there was no dialog and no room for discussion, it was Franks way or leave. So a number of people left or were made to leave. This utter lack of respect for his staff members seems to have persisted. The jobs that I have had since working at TPP were light years ahead in management, perks, work-life balance, personal and professional development. TPP does not compare. There was and according to staff who still work there is no personal or professional development, the perks were ok, but nothing special, the management were clueless and did whatever they want without repercussions. Simply put, I left because I felt it was a dead end job and it still seems to be. At TPP there is no work-life balance - you're on call 24/7 and if you don't like it then you have one option - can you guess what it is? Working in a modern job allows you to be flexible with flexi time, working from home and choose your hours etc, but at TPP there was none of that and probably never will be. Mental health isn't even considered at TPP, probably because of Franks out dated views. There were are multitute of other oddities at TPP which I won't go over, just read the other reviews as they cover the same things that I experienced at the time. Some questions for new starters - ask about staff retention, ask any of the coders about modern working and testing methodologies, ask how much of the cloud they use, ask them about containers, CI/CD and collaboration tools etc, ask about flexible working, ask about fingerprints on the glass. If you still don't care then expect to - be stressed, dread coming into work, not learn anything that can be applied to other jobs when you leave (and you will leave), wish that you'd listen to this review.

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      29 people found this review helpful
    5. 5.0
      Current Employee, more than 5 years

      Great Place To Work

      May 20, 2021 - Analyst in Leeds, England
      Recommend
      CEO Approval
      Business Outlook

      Pros

      TPP is a great company to work for. That's the short summary. The slightly longer explanation follows: The atmosphere in the office has never been better. I've worked at TPP for a while now and I can honestly say I've never felt happier at the company. There's a genuinely supportive workforce, with colleagues who care about each other and the job that they're doing. Getting along with the people you work with really makes the difference. Work during the pandemic has been difficult at times (as has been the case for lots of people at a whole load of different companies). For us, the main challenge was that we've all been determined to work longer and harder to do our bit to support the COVID-19 response. This has meant more stress than normal, more deadlines, shorter deadlines, and a seemingly endless queue of requests for help and support. We've felt - possibly more than ever - the real responsibility resting on our shoulders to get solutions out of the door to help people in their time of need. However, the results of this have been really rewarding. It's a great feeling to know your day-to-day work is having a positive impact, and helping so many people - health and care workers and patients alike. The company has software that is embedded in thousands of healthcare organisations as a long-standing, reliable and trusted system, yet it remains cutting edge and the innovation emerging from the company is increasing all the time. It's an exciting time! Working at TPP, you feel proud of what you're doing and of your contribution to what the company is achieving. Of course, there are lots of other good things too. The salary is great. TPP try to employ the best candidates and have high standards. This could maybe seem a bit daunting if you're applying for a job, but it's reassuring to know that a key part of the country's health infrastructure is in really safe hands. Because of this, the salary is high. They want to attract and retain the best people. Other perks have been written about by numerous others - £200 to spend on a birthday meal with your family and friends, free breakfast sandwiches on Fridays, free fruit (a healthy treat to balance out the bacon butties!), brilliant team building trips, frequent social activities (even if most of these had to be moved online during lockdown), and lots, lots more!

      Cons

      The work can be hard and the workload has increased lately - but that doesn't outweigh all of the positives!

      7 people found this review helpful
    6. 1.0
      Former Employee, more than 5 years

      Frank-enstein's Monster.

      May 5, 2021 - Software Developer in Leeds, England
      Recommend
      CEO Approval
      Business Outlook

      Pros

      The starting salary is high and pay rises are also good, most people will be earning £60k within a few years. No experience required, it's a way to get into software development as a maths/science graduate. You may get to work on some worthwhile projects. You get to write Glassdoor reviews during work hours. Just make sure to stick to the approved cons list: it's stressful being so important, you're so dedicated you think about work at home and sometimes you have to talk to lesser mortals at other organisations.

      Cons

      There's so many crazy things about working at TPP that it's hard to know what to put in a review. Some of them only become apparent when you start working somewhere new. TPP is like a weird enclosed cult segregated from the rest of the tech community. The technology is outdated and working here too long will leave your skills and experience stunted. You'll be thrown in the deep end initially, and it'll feel like you're learning fast, but you won't get the chance to learn anything outside of what you're directly working on. Some companies will help you to develop your skills, and will proactively offer training courses and opportunities to learn new things. TPP will not. It takes quite a lot of work to fill in the gaps before starting at a new workplace. You'll be expected in the office during a pandemic, including for the interview. The working hours are completely inflexible. You may be expected to work all evening and weekend for a deadline, but if you want to leave ten minutes early the next week then you've got no chance. The micro-management is intense. You'll be expected to justify every 5 minutes of your day. If you miss an out of hours phone call, you may be questioned about why and warned not to let it happen again lest your loyalty to the company be doubted. There is an atmosphere of fear, aggression and blame. You'll be encouraged to perpetuate it by pointing out your colleagues mistakes publicly and will always be expected to find out who's fault any bug was. Many of the cons are really all symptomatic of the fact that you're just not trusted to do your job. You may have to leave unexpectedly, whether you're pushed out or just can't stand it anymore. The turnover rate is abysmal. From the information publicly available on companies house, staff numbers have reduced from 250 to 140 in the last few years, despite purchasing a much bigger office suitable for 600 staff and having aims to increase staff numbers. Frank frequently openly makes comments many would consider racist and misogynistic. If you want or need to keep your job you'll have to act like it's totally fine and all just a funny joke. The uncomfortable silences will feel very familiar very soon.

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      32 people found this review helpful
    7. 1.0
      Former Employee, less than 1 year

      In and out thankfully

      Apr 21, 2021 - Product Specialist in Horsforth, England
      Recommend
      CEO Approval
      Business Outlook

      Pros

      There's no denying the salary is very high for a no experience role

      Cons

      My time at TPP was shortlived and while I had read the reviews I went ahead naively thinking that it could not be as bad as it seemed or that i could even help influence a more positive working environment. I want to stress here that i do not recommend that you work here and if you do want some hard evidence - seeing as honesty really is the main thing at this company - then have a google for 'tpp tribunal' and see what you're getting yourself in for. If you do get an offer from this company, the first thing you'll notice is the sheer size of the termination section on your contract. These clauses make it so that you are entirely expendible, regardless of your length of employment. Talk about stressful if you make any financial commitments such as move to within the office radius for example... I like many others ignored the reviews as i took the opportunity as interview practice at first, but when i met Frank i believed him and felt that i could trust him. It quickly became apparent from my first day with a lack of induction process. You'll have a photo taken for your ID card and if you're like me will be taken around the office as theres a scramble to have a laptop set up for you and some equipment scraped together. With 5 people 'leaving' in the 3 weeks I was there I am so relieved that I am out of that environment. I've realised that what Frank says goes and therefore the cons of TPP are also Franks cons and as such cannot approve of his performance as a CEO. I don't think there are bad people here necessarily, but there is a degree of culpability that employees inherit when they work here. You'll have to tell new starts how great working at TPP is and so you become part of the problem knowing fine well that you are putting their welfare in jeopardy. I never had to undertake this task and im so glad as there will be many ex employees who have suffered not just financially but mentally and i would not want to be at fault for that.

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      24 people found this review helpful
    8. 5.0
      Current Employee, more than 5 years

      The future is bright!

      Jun 12, 2020 - Anonymous Employee in Leeds, England
      Recommend
      CEO Approval
      Business Outlook

      Pros

      Working for TPP is extremely rewarding, both financially and emotionally! You get so much job satisfaction from solving real life problems. It’s always really nice to get praise but it seems even more special from front-line NHS workers! What’s also good, and surprising in comparison to other companies, is that everyone working at TPP makes a real difference. We’re all empowered to put forward ideas, attend important meetings and, if necessary, raise any concerns. It’s easy to be empowered as we’re all listened to and encouraged. It’s true that TPP staff work incredibly hard due to their shared passion and determination and it’s also true that because of this we get very well rewarded! Perks have even included sailing and skiing courses abroad! What’s more is that the future is really exciting as technology is being recognised for the vital role it can play in health and social care and I’m reassured that working for a company with over 20 years’ experience and who have been at the forefront of innovation is the best place to be!

      Cons

      It can be frustrating working with other more bureaucratic organisations in the industry as they can slow you down!

      5 people found this review helpful
    9. 5.0
      Current Employee

      Passionate About Healthcare - Making a Difference

      Apr 23, 2020 - Anonymous Employee 
      Recommend
      CEO Approval
      Business Outlook

      Pros

      As a software provider to the NHS, and now to healthcare systems around the world, TPP has always been passionate about healthcare. This has never been more obvious than now, during the coronavirus (Covid-19) pandemic. TPP is doing everything it can to support the NHS in what is one of its most challenging times. The work that we are doing across the company is genuinely mind-blowing - in terms of the volume of work, what that work consists of and the impact that it's having! The innovation that is coming out the company and the overwhelming amount of hard work, time and effort that's being put in by TPP's staff is genuinely uplifting during what is such a difficult time for everyone. Hearing all of the glowing feedback from the NHS and from patients directly about the real, positive impact that TPP is making actually makes me quite emotional and I've never been more proud to work for the company. This is even more impressive given the size of the company. I'd genuinely recommend working at TPP to anyone who's looking for a truly rewarding job where you feel like you're making a real difference.

      Cons

      The normal negatives that you'd have with any job... Monday mornings can be difficult to get out of bed! But this isn't any old job - once you're at work, you really get engrossed, you have fun, and the time flies!

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      11 people found this review helpful
    10. 5.0
      Current Employee, more than 3 years

      Interesting, challenging, enjoyable work, with great benefits

      Oct 6, 2019 - Software Developer in Horsforth, England
      Recommend
      CEO Approval
      Business Outlook

      Pros

      Working at TPP is an immensely enjoyable, rewarding experience. Everyone is extremely bright and hard-working and there's a great collaborative feel with the flat hierarchy and the fact that there's always someone willing to stop what they're doing and help you out, regardless of how long you (or they) have worked at the company. The work we do has a tremendous positive impact on healthcare and provides a constant stream of interesting and complex (but never overwhelming) challenges. The benefits (birthday meals, company-wide trips, pub tabs etc) are great and the pay is very competitive (especially for the region).

      Cons

      Occasional out of hours work - due to the nature of the business (real-time electronic healthcare records and decision support for thousands of clinicians and millions of patients) you can't guarantee that you'll be going home on time every day or that your evenings/weekends will go completely uninterrupted. I've still given five stars for work/life balance because the interruptions are genuinely rare and well-compensated, but for some people it could be a deal-breaker.

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      6 people found this review helpful
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