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University of Cambridge Computer Officer Reviews

4 reviews

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Computer Officer

3.1
StarStarStarStarStar
Recommend to a friend
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University of Cambridge Vice Chancellor Sir Leszek Borysiewicz
Sir Leszek Borysiewicz
0 Ratings

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More Pros and Cons

  1. "A great place to work"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Computer Officer in Cambridge, East of England, England
    Former Employee - Computer Officer in Cambridge, East of England, England
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at University of Cambridge full-time (More than 8 years)

    Pros

    Overall, the university cares about its employees and follows guidelines and rules well. A lot depends on which part you end up working for. Pay is OK, the pension not as good as it once was. The work-life balance is great, with sufficient leave entitlement and flexible working arrangements.

    And of course also plenty of opportunities and support to learn and develop.

    Cons

    Career advancement is usually very slow. 800+ years of history mean that the bureaucracy moves slow, even now.


  2. Helpful (3)

    "UIS: a steady decline"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Computer Officer in Cambridge, East of England, England
    Current Employee - Computer Officer in Cambridge, East of England, England
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at University of Cambridge full-time (More than 10 years)

    Pros

    Get to work with world class academics (and their teams). It would have been hard to have got onto some of the projects I've been on anywhere else, simply because of the cross section of people and teams involved.

    Cons

    I work in the central computing service, which recently re-branded itself the University Information Services (UIS). This has involved the amalgamation of three previous distinct services, and the exercise has been dismal. A whole raft of senior management was brought in on eye watering wages which has left the department funding in such a precarious state that important posts that do actual useful technical work are not being filled when incumbents retire. We spent a couple of months over summer with the entire hardware budget blown, even though people were desperate for kit replacement. The bloated new Directorate (we have seven deputy directors!) is a drain on our financial resources, and the civil service culture that has come with some of them has clashed with the academic/research one at Cambridge. Painful. Still, we've been here long enough to have seen other management come and go, so we hold out for a brighter day.

    Advice to Management

    Stop soft soaping us by holding endless team meetings, focus group sessions, yada yada to then only ignore everything we say and implementing whatever you had in mind in the first place. There are those of us who are now completely disengaged from the UIS after having all input ignored (obviously after being told patronisingly how important such input is).


  3. "Can be interesting and frustrating"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Computer Officer in Cambridge, East of England, England
    Current Employee - Computer Officer in Cambridge, East of England, England
    Recommends
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at University of Cambridge full-time (More than 10 years)

    Pros

    As a computer officer/engineer working in university-wide projects, the scope of work can be exhilarating as one can be working with some of the top research minds in the world. It still has a final salary pension too (though watered down for employees that joined after October 2011), which in this day and age is like gold dust.

    Cons

    Any sort of change tends to be fought against, and the promotion prospects of non-academics (especially tenured ones) are non existant, being done on a strictly dead man's shoes approach. The culture will vary widely depending in which group/department you work. Empire building is rife, and the politics at the higher levels of university administration are so frought that they tangibly impact on the university's lack of progress.

    Advice to Management

    A lot of lip service is paid to being dynamic and having buzzword laden goals, but hardly anything of useful consequence is ever really carried through. My advice would be to stop having never ending reviews that are then constantly watered down, and give far more responsibility to technical workers lower down the chain of command (and who actually know what their users and co-workers want).


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  5. Helpful (1)

    "Great University and Great Town!"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Computer Officer in Cambridge, East of England, England
    Current Employee - Computer Officer in Cambridge, East of England, England

    I have been working at University of Cambridge full-time (More than 10 years)

    Pros

    Some Departments offer Flexible hours. This all depends on your line manager and on the type of work you do, and as long as you do not have to do office hours 9.00-17.00.

    Cons

    The salary is not as high as in most UK Universities unfortunately. One could even say that you have to pay this prestigious University to work for them.

    Advice to Management

    More communication with employees may lead to a greater understanding of current issues and would promote a more positive outcome.