YPrime Reviews | Glassdoor.co.uk

YPrime Reviews

Updated 28 August 2018
19 reviews

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3.2
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Shawn Blackburn
12 Ratings

19 Employee Reviews

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  1. "Educational"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Former Employee - Developer
    Former Employee - Developer

    Pros

    Use the latest Technology for applications

    Cons

    No learning curve, Lack of training

    Advice to Management

    Communicate more precisely. Vague instructions were often roadblocks


  2. Helpful (2)

    "The Outlook is Great!"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at YPrime full-time

    Pros

    -Smart and collaborative coworkers
    -Good balance of professionalism and flexibility
    -Working on products/services that make a difference in the world
    -A leadership team that has great intentions and wants to continuously evolve and improve the organization
    -Non-hierarchical, open door feel at all levels
    -Takes and acts on employee feedback
    -Growing quickly, so lots of opportunity for career development and advancement
    -Great benefits - fully-paid health insurance option, 401(k) with match, company paid dental, vision, life, short and long term disability, unlimited PTO and flexible work arrangements (no set business hours; work from home ability)
    -Family-oriented - values work/life balance
    -Focus on client engagement and building true partnerships with clients
    -Recent improvements with overall organizational communication and transparency

    Cons

    -The company is growing rapidly, which results in frequent changes (not bad change; just inevitable with this type of growth)
    -Changes haven't been managed all that well historically, but there are definite improvements happening in this area
    -There's been a lack of formal training and onboarding, but with the filling of some new roles, the company has learning and development as a top priority for the rest of 2018 and beyond
    -The company has gone through some ups and downs in the past, which results in a bit of lingering insecurity, but with the current growth, success in the market, and strength of our pipeline, the company's future looks brighter than ever

    Advice to Management

    Keep moving down the track you're on; stay open to feedback; follow through on your commitment to learning and development; continue to foster the great YPrime culture; keep the lines of communication open

  3. Helpful (1)

    "Clicky"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at YPrime full-time

    Pros

    Casual dress. Absolutely no other pros.

    Cons

    VERY clicky. If someone doesn't like you, they don't make time to help you. If you're not "part of the gang", you're basically left to fend for yourself. Very stressful job when you can't even get a status from team members. Horrible experience.


  4. Helpful (3)

    "Most employees can't post because they have been warned"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at YPrime full-time

    Pros

    When you divide the "great pay" by the number of work hours you are forced to work, you are paid barely minimum wage.

    Cons

    You are threatened that you cannot say anything negative about the company or they will be retaliate.

    Advice to Management

    You had several employees who worked really hard and long hours and you promised to have their backs but you didn't.


  5. Helpful (1)

    "Project Manager"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at YPrime full-time

    Pros

    Competitive wages, opportunity for advancement, flexible work schedule, unlimited PTO, access to upper managment

    Cons

    Lack of training for new employees, stressful workload


  6. "Great Place to be Impowered, Learn, Create Lasting Friendships and Fly"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Senior Project Manager in Raleigh, NC (US)
    Former Employee - Senior Project Manager in Raleigh, NC (US)
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at YPrime full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    Management is agile, knowledgeable, kind, and lives their core values. YPrime does everything they can to please their clients/sponsors.
    The technology is unsurpassable.

    Cons

    Location is a bit of stretch if you live west of Chapel Hill--but YPrime has flexibility so this is more of by product of poor city planning rather than a con.

    Advice to Management

    Continue with your goals and agility. Continue to follow your hearts. Continue to hire experienced, knowledgeable PMs, and the rest will be history.


  7. Helpful (14)

    "A "Must Read" for Prospective Employees"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Project Analyst in Malvern, PA (US)
    Former Employee - Project Analyst in Malvern, PA (US)
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at YPrime full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    Work/life Balance: Unlimited paid time off and telecommuting options based on an honor system/agreement made between each manager and employee. Flexibility with creating start/end time of your work schedule, within reason (i.e. work during peak business hours, be at mandatory client meetings, etc.). The overseas developers and testers in conjunction with the night shift help desk staff relieve the other project management and technical employees from having to pull all-nighters for urgent deliverables, putting out fires, helping overseas clinical trial sites with issues, etc. Managers across the project management (“ops”) and technical departments work together to create a system for tracking new/in progress work, and allocating time and employee resources to it so as not to overextend employees nor over-promise to clients.

    Culture: The majority of employees are extremely friendly and supportive of one another. They work as a cross-functional team leveraging each other's strengths, knowledge and experience to solve problems and achieve objectives. When things come down to crunch time, you can rely on the aid and support of your counterparts. The managers/directors who I reported to were each genuine, kind, supportive people who had my back in front of clients, other colleagues and leadership. It is frequent and typical for a good sized group of employees from many different departments to go out and sit down at a restaurant together for lunch, sometimes including the company owner, and no one is expected to stand on ceremony or watch the clock to be back at the office by a certain time. The company holds BBQ parties in the summer outside the office during work hours and they are extremely fun (and delicious). The company also holds pot lucks (for holidays and such), and permits employees to bring and partake of alcohol.

    Compensation & Benefits: As mentioned previously, the company offers unlimited paid time off as long as the employee and manager collaborate and agree upon any requests for time off. A standard/borderline-to-competitive salary was offered to me. There was a 401(k) plan as well as good healthcare benefits. No tuition reimbursement.

    Cons

    Work/Life Balance: The workload demands were much too high in comparison to the time and employee resources available. Therefore, many employees from many different teams and departments were seen working late hours from home and even on weekends.

    Culture: YPrime is a small "family business" that began without a real strategic business management plan, mission, vision, and short or long term objectives. YPrime came to fruition because of the spark of an idea for a clinical trial software product. Then, as more and more clinical trial sponsors and CROs liked what they saw and began asking for new things, the powers that be would merely say "yes" and just throw it in the laps of the project management, software development and testing teams to figure it out and make it happen. It was as if every software system built for a new clinical trial protocol was an entirely new and different system from the standard system that the company originally created. To give a simple analogy: If YPrime only had the materials, knowledge and man power to offer one simple recipe of cherry pie to its clients, yet one client suddenly asked if YPrime could bake and decorate an elaborate 9-tiered wedding cake in one hour and twenty-five minutes, YPrime would say "yes" and make their employees figure it out. This “business strategy” for "staying innovative and competitive" was very taxing on the employees who had to pull off these new endeavors.

    Compensation & Benefits: I was not there long enough to see a bonus or merit increase period go by, but when I first came to the company, my colleagues told me not to hold my breath for those things.

    Career Opportunities: There didn't appear to be much room yet to spread your wings and fly from promotion to promotion or from department to department within the company, merely because the company is still young and so small.

    Other: HR does not have a training team to conduct a useful and beneficial new hire training program. I am not speaking of a new hire orientation. I refer more so to generalized training regarding the skills, knowledge and expertise required to perform work at that specific company, with its specific products and services, in its specific industry (training required regardless of one's specific job position). There are also no well established training programs for specific departments or job positions, aside from reading and electronically signing off on mandatory company SOPs and policies via the document management system. The quantity and quality of job specific training provided to new employees varied dependent upon what department they worked in, and how their manager handled new employee training on his/her team. It also depended on whether or not those with senior roles on the team had the time to provide on-the-job training, and give regular feedback and support to the new employees. I witnessed several well-educated, experienced, talented and eager new employees who were left to sit idly at their desks for months (upwards of six months if not more if I recall correctly) without receiving the training necessary to perform even an iota of their job duties. Their managers and senior team members were too overwhelmed with workload to provide on-the-job training, or even schedule periodic training meetings with them. That is ironic too, since their workload would have decreased if they would have just trained those new employees so they could then help with said workload. Instead, the new employees often sat at their desks and did nothing, read a few emails that they were carbon copied on throughout the day, asked neighboring colleagues if they needed help with anything, and did occasional assigned busy-work such as creating or proofreading documents. Apologies and excuses were made regularly by the new employees' managers and senior team members, and they stated that things are just so busy and they will have time to train them soon. Let it be said that these new employees did not take advantage of the situation either. I know many people who would love to get a job where they are paid to sit and stare at the wall for 8 hours per day for 6+ months. No, these employees wanted to work, they asked for work assignments daily and they regularly requested the training necessary to complete their work. It was a shame. An even greater shame was when I watched some of these new employees get set up for failure (as if they weren't already, that is). For example, a senior team member would go on a one or two week vacation or a leave of absence. All of the other team members were so inundated with work, therefore the only back-up person for the absent employee was one of the recently hired and untrained employees. Everything was left in that untrained employee's hands, with their managers' making encouraging promises that they'd help them through things every day until the absent employee returned to the office. Then, their managers would be in meetings all day every day, or too busy to assist them. Other team members and even employees from other departments would do all they could to help these struggling newer staff members left in these situations, but again they too were extremely overwhelmed with work which limited their abilities to do as much as they wished they could in order to help. As a result, I watched this create a domino affect where the client (sponsors and/or CROs), trial sites, depot vendors, and other employees in many other departments were negatively impacted by just one missing/weak link (that was no fault of their own). Some negative consequences were mere inconveniences, while some were highly escalated with very angry clients, deviations and corrective action/preventative action plans.

    Advice to Management

    1. Get "big picture" strategic - Bring in a consultancy firm to observe and assess all facets of your company, then have them assist you in both creating and implementing a strategic business management plan for the company. You will need to do this to (1) dig yourself out of the current ruts you are stuck in, (2) stop digging yourself into even more ruts, and (3) get ahead of it all so you are no longer forced to run your business on a reactionary basis, and are instead moving forward proactively and competitively.

    2. Create a Training Program - Beef up the HR department by adding an experienced training and development team. Get a solid new hire training program in place (no, not just a company orientation), as well as department/job specific new hire training programs. Ensure that this program involves partnering the new hires with someone who will actually complete documented hands-on training, on-the-job training, and job shadowing for an adequate period of time.

    3. Learn to use those new employee resources to their full capacity and potential (train them!). Keep up the good work with maintaining a system for tracking and scheduling the time and employee resources that are truly available to support work volume. Keep fine-tuning that process until you find a one that is not so taxing on the managers to keep up with of course. But, you are on the right track, and what you've been doing there was absolutely necessary. Hats off to you on that.

    4. Get a performance management system (employee appraisal process) in place. Managers should be meeting with employees bi-weekly (new hires: weekly for the first 6 months) to receive and provide coaching and feedback. Formal documented appraisals should be completed and filed in an HRIS every 6 months to one year.

    5. Find a better approach to innovation and growth - The approach to innovation and growth can't simply be reactionary - "Oh Mr. Client, you want a product that does what? Ok sure! We can do that!"...,....."Hello to our YPrime employees - Let's figure out how to create this new-fangled contraption for this client in X time frame. Then we can begin offering that to other clients too!" Bad process! Break that terrible start-up business mentality now. If you want to grow past a start-up and remain competitive as well, you need to find a way to get ahead of things in your industry, to study and predict what the market needs, and then begin innovating to create solutions before your customers have thought of it or asked for it themselves. Then, you can add it to your list of products and services for other clients to jump on.

  8. Helpful (1)

    "Project Manager"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at YPrime full-time

    Pros

    Management cares about employees. The work is rewarding. Great people to work with.

    Cons

    Work/Life balance isn’t easily achievable for some roles. Not enough focus on advancing product. Seems to not move past “growing pain” phase.


  9. Helpful (3)

    "Don't trust positive reviews!"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at YPrime full-time

    Pros

    You can give up your moral ethics for great pay

    Cons

    Mgmt background is NOT in clinical. Makes a lot of promises to clients that they know they will not honor. When client sends emails, multiple managers respond with conflicting resolutions. The product work has to be redone multiple times. Once they determine that they are no longer making money on a client, you are told to stop working on that client's account. Then management scapegoats you when the client gets mad.

    Advice to Management

    Get acquired quickly


  10. "Growing company with growing pains"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Malvern, PA (US)
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Malvern, PA (US)
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at YPrime full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    Small company feel
    Unlimited PTO
    Flexible schedule
    Access to executives

    Cons

    Self-motivation required!
    Small company growing pains (can be a roller coaster ride)

    Advice to Management

    Add some structure without becoming overbearing


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