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BBC Reviews

Updated 15 January 2019
677 reviews

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3.9
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BBC Director-General Tony Hall
Tony Hall
261 Ratings

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  1. "Privileged to work here"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Production Apprentice in Glasgow, Scotland
    Current Employee - Production Apprentice in Glasgow, Scotland
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at BBC full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    As a relatively new and junior member of staff who joined straight from school, I feel very privileged to be working in such a friendly, supportive and welcoming workplace.

    The work I've done has been challenging, rewarding and immensely interesting and varied. I look forward to arriving there in the morning ahead of a busy day, and I regularly find myself out of the office on assignments.

    I would highly recommend a role at the BBC to anyone.

    Cons

    Honestly, I'm struggling to think of any.


  2. "Marketing Manager"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in London, England
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in London, England
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at BBC full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    Very collaborative, passionate and hardworking employees from across the business. The content that you're working with is really creative while there is plenty of opportunity to work across the business and learn new things. The training opportunities are good and self development is widely encouraged.

    Cons

    A bit too much red tape, senior management indecision and can occasionally be risk averse. Financial and resource strains are a constant barrier to success and supporting the objective of increasing reach to a younger audience.

    Advice to Management

    Be a bit more brave, a bit more risky and focus less on pleasing over-served opinion formers.

  3. "Love working here in the science department"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    Pros

    Lovely colleagues, central London location, and meaningful project.

    Cons

    There are no major cons for me.


  4. "Great place to work"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Production Coordinator in London, England
    Former Employee - Production Coordinator in London, England

    I worked at BBC part-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    Great working environment, supportive colleagues

    Cons

    Workload a little too intense at times


  5. "Brilliant but frustrating"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at BBC full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    Proud of our world class content and everything the BBC stands for. Brilliant, talented colleagues who stay so long because they care about what they do - and not for the money! Great to make a difference and be part of a British institution. Modern, central offices.

    Cons

    The licence fee places huge restrictions on what we can do. Under resourced. Risk averse. Heirarchical. Overly apologetic - we tend to throw ourselves under the bus before anyone else has a chance to. Yes we’ve got work to do around our diversity and culture - show me an organisation of our size, complexity and heritage that doesn’t. Culture change doesn’t happen over night, but we’re leading the way. All of this makes for frustrations day to day, but all worth it when you see the end result.


  6. "analyst"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    Pros

    free tv, great snacks, was fun

    Cons

    I dont like tv, radio or media


  7. Helpful (7)

    "Nice place to work, I miss it"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Software Engineer in London, England
    Former Employee - Software Engineer in London, England
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at BBC full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    - Great people, I had lots of fun and learned a lot from them.
    - Great place to start, many opportunities, many people to learn from.
    - Relaxed environment.
    - Good equipment.
    - Flexible time and possibility of working from home.
    - Looks great in your CV!
    - Very stable company.
    - It's really cool to work for TV, you get to see the studios, learn how they deliver the content and learn some trivia no one else knows.
    - You can move between teams, departments and even types of job. It's difficult, but possible.
    - Relocation is easy.
    - There is a BBC club with discounts, language courses, gym, etc.
    - You can watch anything the BBC has been producing in the past years.
    - You can access decades of archives (if you make an effort, and if you heave sufficient clearance).

    Cons

    For starters, the BBC don't usually explain to candidates in London about the "London weighting". This weighting is part of the gross salary, so it is a bonus that will not be "added" to your income, but deducted if you move to another city.

    The BBC is huge. It means things can be very bureaucratic. The HR department is located in Northern Ireland, and so is some of the IT support. That must be alright for people who live there, but for people elsewhere it's a bit of a stretch to get some help from them.

    Projects can be badly defined because there are so many people involved and no one is really sure how things will progress. That means that while some projects have far off deadlines, some atypical last-minute requirements appear out of the blue and people have to deal with it.

    The BBC is divided into Television, Radio and Design and Engineering. D&E normally hires contractors for most projects, and since they are quite competent, they make key decisions some times. And when these decisions are taken unilaterally they can backfire on the permanent staff. It happened several times in my department.

    There is no proper training for newcomers. While there is a BBC introduction course, it is very generic and you have to figure a lot of your work by yourself unless someone steps in.

    IT support is not great. It is often time-consuming and stressful. I saw people using their private software licences to work because they couldn't be bothered to ask for support. That's not nice.

    Salary is below industry standards and the only perks are salary deductible. If you work for the BBC, you don't get a TV licence discount. So if you pay the licence, you pay your own salary... It doesn't make much sense.

    The BBC has to many managers. I had 7 managers in a hierarchy and 3 transversal managers. Some of them have very mysterious jobs.

    The BBC's main income is the TV licence. Since an article was published in a newspaper about a party organised by the BBC, they stopped doing events for their employees. So the BBC tends to always attempting to be thrifty. But some times it is too much. For example, they don't invest enough in training. There is some training, but few and far in between.

    Saving money also leads to debates with unions. The last time it happened (around 2016) they froze all promotions. That can make things very slow in career progression and the only way up is applying for jobs as if you never worked at the BBC before. And that can take some time.

    BBC software development teams do not normally use agile methodologies, even though they say they do. All in-house software must be wired at some point to a main, central database and it is immense. There is no code re-factoring. Software efficiency is considered less important than making it look nice. Also, the BBC never ever deletes data. There is an endemic paranoia that all data collected is useful, which is not true. BBC's databases tend to infinity.

    The food halls are a mixed bag. The food halls at New Broadcasting House and Broadcast Centre are expensive and the food isn't great. Access to places like Television Centre, for example, is limited to certain people. TVC has very decent food, though, and it's a block away from BC, but alas, if you work at BC, you can't get into TVC unless you are being invited. The reason being that TVC is not really BBC, it is BBC Studios, a different company.

    You don't get to travel much between BBC branches, not even within the same city. Only on very special occasions like training or some very important department meeting. That's a bit of a shame, because knowing the other branches could mean more networking, and that can be very useful in a place like BBC.

    Advice to Management

    You should implement a serious retention strategy at the BBC. The typical workflow is:

    1. Senior engineer A leaves the company for whatever reason.
    2. Hard-working engineer B wants to be promoted.
    3. Engineer B applies for promotion.
    4. Nothing happens. A new senior engineer C is hired from outside the BBC with a bigger salary and no training.
    5. Engineer B is frustrated that his application was not even considered. Starts looking for a job outside.
    6. Engineer B leaves the BBC and takes all his knowledge with him.
    7. Engineer C is stuck with a product he doesn't understand, no one to guide him and is unproductive for many months.

    This situation is too expensive. In this example, if you gave engineer B a salary raise and/or a promotion or at least the possibility of advancing in his career, it would prevent him from chasing a new opportunity and you would not spend the TV licence's capital into an unproductive engineer. Advancing B to senior and hiring C as a regular engineer is cheaper and keeps the business knowledge intact.

  8. "Recruiter"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at BBC full-time

    Pros

    A company that pays well

    Cons

    Political company with many managers


  9. "Fantastic place to work"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Senior Resourcing Advisor in Salford, North West England, England
    Current Employee - Senior Resourcing Advisor in Salford, North West England, England
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at BBC full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    The people, flexible working with amazing work-life balance, culture, benefits and generally being part of a fantastic organisation.

    Cons

    It's fairly slow moving with red-tape in certain areas.


  10. "Reporter"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Former Employee - Trainee reporter in Norwich, England
    Former Employee - Trainee reporter in Norwich, England

    I worked at BBC (Less than a year)

    Pros

    Great company to get work experience

    Cons

    No cons, where better to start than with the BBC.